News

The former principal of embattled Charlotte public charter school Entrepreneur High says he plans to file a complaint Friday afternoon to seek reinstatement as head of the school and the ability to reopen its doors early next week.

“Yes, I plan to reopen the school,” Dr. Hans Plotseneder told N.C. Policy Watch Friday. “My termination [as principal] was not following the legal procedure…it was wrongful and I need to be reinstated. My lawyer is on the way to court now.”

Dr. Plotseneder says the chairman of the nonprofit board for Entrepreneur High School, Mr. Robert L. Hillman, did not follow proper procedure when he added new members to the board on January 18. On that day, says Plotseneder, Hillman then had enough votes to formally terminate him as principal (he was fired before Christmas) and get the green light to close the school’s doors.

Mr. Hillman could not be reached for comment Friday.

Entrepreneur High School abruptly shut down a week ago. The school only had $14 in its bank account and enrollment was far below the statutory minimum of 65 students. New Hanover Schools superintendent Tim Markley, who served as a reviewer of Plotseneder’s multiple applications to the state to open EHS, told N.C. Policy Watch he voted against its opening twice, saying “the financials weren’t there.” Read More

Commentary

Death penaltyToday’s exoneration of Joseph Sledge after 36 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit gives rise to one overriding question today:

How many more men wrongfully convicted and imprisoned (or even sent to Death Row) is it going to take before the stubborn defenders of the death penalty in North Carolina finally admit that it is simply impossible to impose such a punishment in a fair and foolproof way?

Unless one simply goes along with the mind-boggling and terrifying position of Antonin Scalia that there is nothing wrong or unconstitutional  with executing a person “who had a full and fair trial but is later able to convince a court that he is ‘actually’ innocent,” any honest person must simply admit that the time has finally come to end the death penalty once and for all.

Commentary

Climate change - droughtThe good people at the Center for American Progress have released a new and sobering set of fact sheets documenting the abysmal state of climate change denial in Washington. Sadly, several members of North Carolina’s congressional delegation are “recognized” for being on record in support of the denial efforts. The list includes: Senators Richard Burr and Thom Tillis and Representatives Virginia Foxx, Richard Hudson, Walter Jones, Robert Pittenger, David Rouzer and Mark Walker (as well as Gov. Pat McCrory).

This is, of course, a tragic and maddening state of affairs given the the fact that ninety-seven percent of climate scientists (as well as several fossil fuel companies!) agree that current human activity is contributing to the warming atmosphere and causing the global climate to change.

Unfortunately, as the fact sheets note, North Carolina’s denier delegation is far from alone:

  • One hundred sixty-nine Republicans in the 114th Congress are on record questioning or denying the science behind climate change.
  • Fifty-three percent—or 131 members—of the House Republican caucus question or deny the science behind climate change.
  • Seventy percent—or 38 members—of the Senate Republican caucus question or deny the science behind climate change.

Click here to see the North Carolina fact sheet and the disturbing documentation with respect to each of our head-in-the-sand lawmakers.

Commentary
Paul Stam 2

State Rep. Paul Stam

If you had any hopes that this year’s version of the North Carolina General Assembly would be less reactionary than the last two, these should have been quickly dashed in recent days by the announcement that the 2015 session will commence its substantive work next Wednesday with a “briefing” on a bill to sanction and promote discrimination against the state’s LGBT population.

The proposal comes, of course, from that irrepressible foe of tolerance and modernity, Rep. Paul Stam of Wake County — a man who has devoted the lion’s share of his years in elected office to advancing a narrow and backward-looking social agenda. Under this latest proposal, Stam would attempt to allow registers of deeds and magistrates to opt out of serving LGBT citizens seeking marriage licenses if doing so “would violate their core religious beliefs.” No word yet on whether Stam would allow similar treatment of officials with “religious” objections to interracial marriage.

Happily, there is a deep and growing wellspring of opposition to Stam’s sham. Chris Sgro of Equality NC does a fine job of explaining this opposition on the editorial page of this morning’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer. Here is an excerpt: Read More

News

 

P

A college education for free.

That’s the response heard most often from those asked what elite Division 1 athletes are getting in exchange for working full-time for their schools.

That includes the schools and the NCAA, who make millions in some cases off the backs of these players.

The players get no part of those earnings and, as we’ve learned in recent years, often have barely enough money to buy a meal.

When challenged, those institutions are quick to emphasize the “student” part of the student-athlete experience.

“Student-athlete success on the field, in the classroom and in life is at the heart of our mission,”  the NCAA says on the front page of its website

The athletes toppled the money part of that myth this past summer when, in a lawsuit filed on behalf of former UCLA basketball player Ed O’Bannon and others, they convinced a judge that the NCAA had violated antitrust laws and won an injunction allowing schools to share a limited amount of revenues with players.

And now the academic piece is about to fall.

Yesterday, in a 100-page class action complaint filed in Durham County Superior Court, two former UNC-Chapel Hill athletes sued both the university and the NCAA,  alleging that both failed to ensure that athletes got the education they were promised.

The lawsuit is the latest offshoot of the academic scandal that has rocked UNC, arising out of no-show paper classes into which athletes were pushed for years. Read More