The market capitalism lovers at Forbes announced today for the fifth time in eight years that the Raleigh metro area is the nation’s best for business and careers. Here are the factors highlighted first in the story

Fueling Raleigh’s consistent results are business costs that are 18% below the national average, and an adult population where 42% have a college degree, the 12th best rate in the U.S. (30% is the national average). Raleigh is home to North Carolina State University and nearby schools include Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The area’s appeal has led to a strong inflow of new residents to the city, which boasts the sixth fastest net migration rate over the past five years. (Emphasis supplied.)

Perhaps the Forbes people could share this information with their fellow travelers over at the Raleigh-based Pope Center for Higher Education, which has been banging the drum for years that — we are not making this up — North Carolina has too many college students and graduates and the value of higher education has been “oversold.”

Gov. Pat McCrory, previously a Common Core supporter, signed a bill into law Tuesday that could set the stage for North Carolina to Common Core picrid itself of the more rigorous academic standards—although he doesn’t quite see it that way.

“It (the legislation) does not change any of North Carolina’s education standards,” McCrory said in a press release indicating his support for the legislation. “It does initiate a much-needed, comprehensive and thorough review of standards.”

Lawmakers began moving toward a repeal of the Common Core standards months ago, which are a set of guidelines that that the state adopted in 2010 which outline what students should be able to know and do in mathematics and English language arts.

The House passed legislation that would repeal the standards and force the State Board of Education to consider alternatives that would not include the Common Core. But the Senate version, sponsored by Sen. Jerry Tillman, keeps the door open for Common Core, allowing a review commission of mostly political appointees to recommend to the State Board some or even all of the standards currently in place.

Forty-five states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards, which were developed by local stakeholders, the National Governors Association and The Council of Chief State School Officers, of which North Carolina’s State Superintendent, Dr. June Atkinson, is president-elect.

But states have recently begun to step away from the standards. Indiana, Oklahoma and South Carolina have repealed Common Core, and numerous other states have expressed their intention to renege on their promise to implement them in various ways.

North Carolina has spent many millions on implementing the Common Core, using mostly federal Race to the Top (RttT) funds. The state has spent at least $72 million of RttT money on transitioning to the Common Core, and an additional $68 million was spent on building local districts’ technological capacity to be able to deliver on the new standards.

Outside of RttT funds, local school districts have also spent their own money on CCSS implementation – and it’s difficult to even put a figure on that cost.

While Sen. Tillman’s legislation seems like a compromise, potentially allowing Common Core to stay — it should be noted that Tillman has been a vehement opponent of the standards, telling some folks at a news conference last May that Common Core is a sellout and “we’ve sold our soul.”

“Well, they dangled $430 million dollars out there, Race to the Top. Good old easy money, bought us off…But we got some powerful people fighting this thing. And so I want us to stop it [Common Core],” said Tillman.

Tillman will likely play a role behind the scenes in suggesting who will sit on the Academic Standards Review Commission, which will comprise four appointees selected by Senate leader Phil Berger, four appointees selected by Speaker Thom Tillis, 2 members of the State Board of Education and one appointee of Gov. Pat McCrory.

Stay tuned to learn who will sit on that commission, which is designed to determine the fate of the Common Core standards in North Carolina.

 

With the release last month of the latest labor market figures, the Budget & Tax Center has updated as well its estimate of the number of missing workers in North Carolina’s labor market.  This measure estimates the number of workers who would be in the labor market, looking for work, if job opportunities were stronger.  In June 2014, the number of missing workers remained elevated at 241,445.  If these workers were counted in the unemployment rate, that rate would be 11.5 percent rather than the official 6.4 percent for that month.

BTC - Missing Workers June 2014

In combination with the state’s persistent jobs deficit, the missing worker measure points to a still weak labor market with too few jobs for those who want to work.

Pat McCrory 4There is a lot of lousy stuff happening the world of immigration these days and, lord knows, the Obama administration deserves its share of the blame — mostly for its unfortunate kowtowing to the xenophobic right and its aggressive deportation of thousands of good people who pose no threat to our country.

That said, there can be no doubt that the lion’s share of the blame for the current disastrous situation lies with those who stubbornly oppose comprehensive immigration reform that would provide a path to citizenship for “DREAM’ers” and millions who are here to stay while dramatically increasing the opportunities for legal immigration for Central Americans fleeing broken societies.

Given this factual backdrop, this week’s award for most ridiculous, self-serving and utterly irrelevant “contribution” to the discussion has to be this letter to the President from a group of six conservative Republican governors that includes North Carolina’s own Pat McCrory. In it, the six (which includes far right “humanitarians” like Scott Walker and Sam Brownback) call for a “plan” that will deal with the current crisis in which thousands of children have crossed the border in a “humanitarian and practical way.”

But, of course, the not-so-thinly-veiled undercurrent of the letter is plain: the Guvs want Obama to make these kids go away ASAP.

“More importantly, we are concerned that the failure to return the unaccompanied children will send a message that will encourage a much larger movement towards our southern border.”

And naturally, the letter provides zero in the way of specifics as to how to do this — much less an endorsement of comprehensive immigration reform that is the only hope for making a dent.

The bottom line: Gov. McCrory has more than enough policy crises of his own making to deal with in North Carolina. The last thing he needs to be doing is trying to tell President Obama what to do about an intractable issue like immigration reform when he can’t even control Art Pope, Phil Berger or Thom Tillis.

Get Covered AmericaThe good folks over at Get Covered America, who have been working tirelessly and with great success to get hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians into affordable health insurance over the last several months despite the mean-spirited obstructionism of the state’s conservative political leadership, issued the following common sense response to today’s competing U.S. Court of Appeals rulings:

Today the Federal Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, which covers North Carolina, ruled in the King v Burwell case that the U.S. Internal Revenue Service does have authority to issue tax subsidies in states with a federally facilitated marketplace such as North Carolina. In a separate ruling today, the federal court in DC ruled differently. The end result, is that nothing changes for the 357,584 North Carolinians that already enrolled in insurance on the federal marketplace and nothing changes for those who can still enroll now. While the legal process takes its course, Get Covered America-North Carolina staff and volunteers will continue to reach out to uninsured North Carolinians and let them know about the financial help that continues to be available to them during the current Special Enrollment Period and the upcoming Open Enrollment Period beginning in November. The financial assistance made available by the Affordable Care Act to help consumers afford health coverage has made a huge difference for thousands of North Carolinia families. In fact, 91% of North Carolinians who enrolled in insurance on the federal marketplace are receiving financial assistance to pay for it. The clear intention of the law is to make health insurance affordable for all Americans. (Emphasis supplied.)