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Saturday’s Event

HK on J

In case you missed Saturday's NAACP rally, "H K on J", things actually went very well — better even than some media reports portrayed it. Things started on time, moved smoothly and were generally well organized and produced. If one takes into account all the folks who participated — not just those who filled Memorial Auditorium (capacity 2277), there had to be close to 3,000 folks in attendance. All in all, a great first effort for the NC NAACP.

5 Comments


  1. Dallas Woodhouse

    February 12, 2007 at 4:19 pm

    Lets all hope they fail at their mission to bring unions to North Carolina. As a city of Raleigh resident, I have seen my trash collection tax go up, while my service has gone down, now only picked up one day a week. I pay plenty for this service and do not want to be subjected to trash strikes.

  2. MICHAEL GUILFORD

    February 12, 2007 at 7:35 pm

    I MICHAEL GUILFORD SUPPORT THE UE-150 PUBLIC SERVICE UNION.I AM ALSO A MEMBER .

  3. Dallas Woodhouse

    February 13, 2007 at 10:47 am

    I hope you will come pick up my trash

  4. gregflynn

    February 13, 2007 at 5:08 pm

    I hope you can separate personal disdain for taxes and unions from the individuals who working 10 hour plus days in all weather conditions collecting our trash. If you dislike taxes you should be outraged that much of the burdens of growth are being paid out of taxes and fees on existing residents. Growth should pay for itself instead of cannibalizing existing property taxes.

    Frequency of service does not necessarily correlate with a level of service. A 2006 survey of Raleigh residents:

    found nearly 90 percent of respondents are satisfied with the same-day curbside solid waste, yard waste and recycling collections
    :::::
    Most customers found that the same day service made it easier to remember what day collection occurred.

    Solid waste fees have risen for existing Raleigh residents in large part because growth is not paying for itself. The cost of delivering services to remote low-density development in around the ETJ is higher than in the more compact core.

    Cost have also risen because for too long the City kept the costs artificially low by not properly paying overtime to some employees working longer than 10 hours per day in all weather conditions and by keeping some employees classified indefinitely as “temporary workers” to avoid paying benefits.

    In addition, while the City dropped let 6 workers go as part of the new “efficiency” in collection, it also increased the number of materials collected curbside. While not necessarily impacting overall cost, increased sorting increases workload.

    These people work hard and don’t get to stop to clean up to go eat the cheap food at the Legislative cafeteria but they are no less deserving of respect and representation than any other citizens who can afford to pay lobbyists to wander the halls of the General Assembly on their behalf.

  5. aplum

    February 13, 2007 at 6:34 pm

    Well said Greg. If workers were being treated fairly, we wouldn’t be talking about unions.

    I can understand why Dallas is worried about the impact on his property taxes. Our out-dated tax system relies too heavily on sales taxes and property taxes to pay for services and schools, which leaves the middle class shouldering the burden. We need to modernize our tax system so that the burden is distributed more fairly.

    And one other thought Dallas, if you hauled your own trash to the dump a few times, like those of us living in the county do, maybe you’d realize the real value of the service that the Raleigh sanitation workers are providing.

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