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More political shenanigans from the coast

As a resident of the Cape Fear area, seems nothing can surprise.  Assemblyman in jail, sheriff indicted, ABC board buying real estate with public funds without any public disclosure or oversight, rampant municipally approved building in "protected" wetlands areas.  But a TV spot last night beat all as far as I'm concerned.

I've supported Julia Boseman and have voted for her. I think she's an effective voice in Raleigh for our area and the state as a whole, sensitive to concerns of both Old and New Wilmington.  Shucks, her people even wrote me a letter when there was an article about my business in the paper.   My feeling has always been that people's lives are their business, and they should be entitled to live those lives as they desire as long as they don't impact negatively or injure others in the process. But, if you decide to enter the public arena through government employment on politics on any level, then your conduct immediately goes under scrutiny that has to be at least acknowledged.

As most of you know, some untoward disclosures about Ms. Boseman have come to light in recent weeks.   A foreclosure on a jointly owned property, admission of pot smoking in the recent past, custody fights over an adopted son with a previous partner, even a disclosed public "lip lock" at a very public NASCAR event. 

Ms. Boseman is currently airing a thirty second tv spot where she implies much of the impetus for her recent bad PR stems from her fighting for what's right for her son, just as you or I would.  In addition, the commercial has the unique feel of slick production values only attainable with financial resources from outside the Cape Fear area.  Mere words can't express the depth of my disappointment for her lack of class, culpability, or even sense of what is really happening.

I consider myself to be pretty "alternate lifestyle tolerant", but I can't stomach a progressively minded politician falling into the same muck that makes most other elected officials so unsavory.  Get your life together, pay your bills, but don't wave the flag of family values as a crass attempt to regain public support.  I never felt Julia would loose my vote, but I'm feeling pretty disappointed in one elected official that I thought had some good ideas and was effective in carrying them out.

6 Comments

  1. Dallas Woodhouse

    July 20, 2008 at 2:10 pm

    Hello, since Boseman was on your mind, I thought I would point this one out. Boseman twice walked out on important votes about a 1% meals tax in Durham County. On second and Third reading she did not cast a vote on this important issue. Below you will find a post by Chad Adams on the subject.

    AFP worked to defeat this tax proposal and we worked with many liberal members of the General Assembly who did not think a tax on food for a minor league baseball museum was a good idea. When the poor who will be hardest hit by this tax (if it is passed by the voters) needed Julia Boseman….she took a walk.

    Boseman Walks, RC Soles Votes For and Against Same Tax
    Posted July 18th, 2008 at 11:37 AM by Chad Adams

    Sen. Boseman (D-New Hanover) and Sen. RC Soles (Columbus) are doing some interesting things in the waning days of this legislative session. According to the News and Observer, “Despite an initial vote of disapproval Wednesday, the Durham restaurant tax survived when the Senate reversed itself in a tentative 20-18 vote giving Durham permission to ask residents to approve a tax. You just gotta love a guy like Soles who seems to stand on both sides:

    Sen. R.C. Soles of Columbus County, who voted against it, asked to have the vote reconsidered. It then passed 20-18 with Soles voting in favor.
    Soles helped revive the bill in committee earlier Wednesday using the same maneuver, when the Senate Finance Committee first voted to kill the bill.

    Let’s kind of put that in perspective with events in the senate. Essentially, such a bill has to pass second and third reading. On second reading there was a 19-19 tie. In this vote, Soles voted against the tax. But when Soles realized that his vote had killed it, he asked for the vote to be reconsidered. At that time he changed his vote which allowed the bill to pass 20-18. Boseman, who was present at the General Assembly did not vote. Her vote was listed as “NOT CAST” but I doubt you’ll see much coverage of such actions.

    She also was at the General Assembly during the third reading but did not vote again. Looks like politics are more important than casting a vote here. Soles’ actions are also looking like political gamesmanship.

    African Americans in Durham appear to be lining up against the proposal to tax food. The bill that would allow Durham’s governments to hold a referendum on whether to levy a 1 percent sales-tax surcharge on restaurant meals. Proponents desire the millions it would raise for cultural amenities, like the proposed Minor League Baseball museum and repairs to the Durham Civic Center.

    So where does Sen Boseman stand?

  2. gregflynn

    July 20, 2008 at 8:53 pm

    Dallas, Your Republican roots are showing. Boseman was one of the Democratic Senators along with Senator Snow who was opposed to the transfer tax option. She is fiscally conservative. Your reposting of Adams commentary smacks of political opportunism more than principle and confirms that AFL and John Locke are little more than the propaganda wing of the Republican Party ready to coordinate with whatever Berger or Stam press conference is at hand as recorded by Mitch Kokai of JLF. AFP and JLF are into the NCGOP supporting role so deep that the only principles you all understand are the $1,000s you get from Art Pope every year to put a spin on NC public affairs.

  3. deepani

    July 21, 2008 at 2:04 am

  4. [...] control the state legislature Posted in North Carolina by jhs on July 21st, 2008 Seems like family values pandering isn’t just for Republicans [...]

  5. James

    July 21, 2008 at 9:06 am

  6. Dallas Woodhouse

    July 21, 2008 at 10:09 am

    I was telling you what I witnessed. She took a walk on a tough vote