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Post-Mortem

Frank Rich delivered the definitive post-mortem on the 2008 election in his column here. My favorite part is this:

The post-Bush-Rove Republican Party is in the minority because it has driven away women, the young, suburbanites, black Americans, Latino-Americans, Asian-Americans, educated Americans, gay Americans and, increasingly, working-class Americans. Who’s left?

Who’s left? White, non-college educated males over age 65 who live within 100 miles of the Blue Ridge Parkway, that’s who.

Keep these demographics in mind when the conservatives say President-Elect Obama shouldn’t “over-reach” and try to enact progressive policies because we are a “center-right” nation. Personally, I would like to see a bold, rather than a cautious, President Obama.

8 Comments

  1. Rob Schofield

    November 10, 2008 at 2:31 pm

    Well said as usual, Steve. Paul Krugman’s take in the NYT today makes a similar point about the need for boldness.

    “In short, Mr. Obama’s chances of leading a new New Deal depend largely on whether his short-run economic plans are sufficiently bold. Progressives can only hope that he has the necessary audacity.”

  2. Dave Jerrido

    November 10, 2008 at 7:03 pm

    If you ask me, it’s people like Karl Rove and right wing media radicals like Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh that have driven away women, the young, suburbanites, African-Americans, Latino-Americans, Asian-Americans, educated Americans, gay Americans and, increasingly, working-class Americans. These demographics came out in force and elected Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States.

  3. Kimberly

    November 11, 2008 at 8:20 am

    President Elect Obama has to be very bold and work very fast to begin repairing every aspect of our economy, health care system, justice system, and our system of government. As much as people may not like drastic and fast change, it is necessary to save our country. So far, it appears that President Elect Obama is keeping his promises and will provide the change we all need. Unfortunately, there is still a demographic that supports President Bush’s policies.

  4. IBXer

    November 11, 2008 at 8:54 am

  5. sturner

    November 11, 2008 at 9:55 am

    Here is what IBXer is referring to:

    “But there was virtually no change in the ideological spectrum: This year 22 percent called themselves liberal, compared with 21 percent in 2004; 44 percent moderate, compared with 45 percent; and 34 percent conservative, same as four years ago.”

    Of course, it’s not the “label” that matters…it’s the voting trends. 1 in 5 self-described “conservatives” voted for Obama. If the Republican Party shifts further to the right, those trends will worsen for them.

    IBXer…serious question…who do you think should lead the conservative movement at this time?

  6. IBXer

    November 12, 2008 at 9:17 am

    Michael Steele
    Bobby Jindal
    Charlie Crist
    Mitt Romney
    Tim Pawlenty
    Newt Gingrich

  7. sturner

    November 12, 2008 at 10:24 am

    Thanks.

    David Brooks would put you in the G.O.P. “Reformists” group, as opposed to the “Traditionalists.” As he describes in this column:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/11/opinion/11brooks.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

    To the G.O.P.’s detriment, Brooks believes the Traditionalists will rule the Party over the short-term.

  8. IBXer

    November 13, 2008 at 8:28 am