Uncategorized

A Sensible Approach to Marijuana? Bound to Go Up in Smoke

Cheech and ChongCheck out the medical marijuana smackdown over on NBC17′s website. A whopping 94% of those who responded to an online poll support the legalization of pharmaceutical THC. Obviously the poll is not scientific, but it’s still impressive. The Internet is accepted widely enough that we can’t assume everyone who answers online poll questions is smoking the wacky weed. I suppose answering questions about ganga may indicate a predisposition in that direction, but you could also argue that opponents of that scary gateway drug would be just as likely to seek out said polls. Seems there aren’t many opponents around here, because they’re not getting all bent out of shape over the idea of a few glaucoma and cancer patients toking up and getting the munchies.

The bill in question, H1380, would make it legal for people suffering from “debilitating medical conditions” to possess an “adequate supply” of “medical marijuana”, which they or their “caregivers” could purchase from a “licensed producer” without fear of arrest. It also specifies that the use of medical marijuana could not be held against the patient in custody or child welfare cases. The bill is very specific regarding registry cards and their uses, the production of the drug, and the licensing of dispensaries. It includes this little known ditty:

The United States Department of Health and Human Services, through the Compassionate Investigational New Drug (IND) program, provides marijuana by prescription to a number of individuals for their use as medicine. The marijuana is grown at the federal marijuana research garden at the University of Mississippi and is processed and distributed by the Research Triangle Institute in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The patients receive the marijuana monthly in canisters of approximately 300 prerolled cigarettes. The dosage for patients in the IND program ranges from seven to nine grams per day. Since the program’s inception in 1978, patients in the IND program have received and consumed approximately 6.5 pounds of marijuana per year, thereby establishing a safe and effective dosage for chronic daily-use patients to possess and consume. The IND program was closed to new applicants in 1991.”

That saucy RTI, I’ve never seen the “Rolling a Fat One” job advertised!

Seriously, if you’ve gotten HIV, glaucoma, epilepsy, or cancer since 1991, you’re out of luck. The House bill aims to rectify that, for North Carolinians at least. It is, in short, a comprehensive and wholly sensible approach to letting suffering people seek relief from a relatively harmless but long vilified narcotic. Therefore, I doubt it will get out of the General Assembly looking anything like it currently does. C’mon, ledge, prove me wrong.

2 Comments

  1. James

    April 16, 2009 at 3:34 pm

    The phrase “pipe dream” comes to mind.

  2. [...] say, go for it. North Carolina should follow suit, double time, and at least look at the issue. We know we’ve got a bumper crop going in RTP, let’s extrapolate. More money for farmers and [...]