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What is the mission of UNC’s School of Public Health?

Back in September 2008 the UNC School of Public Health changed its name to the remarkably clunky UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. It was named after Dennis Gillings, founder and CEO of pharmaceutical consulting giant Quintiles Transnational, after he gave the school gobs of money.

There was a great deal of concern among some faculty, staff, and students that the name change would come with major policy shifts at the school toward research that favors private industry over public health. Critics noted that Quintiles executives were popping up on various boards at the school.

Now this humorous note.

Gillings is speaking at the 2009 NC CEO Forum and his bio includes this line:

In September, 2008, the School of Public Health at UNC Chapel Hill was named the Gillings School of Global Public Health. The mission is to advance the impact of economic and methodological research on health in both the developed and developing world.

Funny, that doesn’t sound like the mission statement of the school:

Our mission is to improve public health, promote individual well-being, and eliminate health disparities across North Carolina and the world.

Nope, nothing in there about economics.

3 Comments


  1. Eugene Barufkin

    April 17, 2009 at 7:42 pm

    Who ever says money is not the root of all evil, lies.
    This is a state school, not a for profit business.
    Send Gillings and Quintiles money back.

    Mr Bowles,
    – How we be assured of pure research free of all commercial interests?
    – How can the School Of Public Health honestly function independent of all for profit interests?
    – How can the professors hold their heads up high in this greedy shameless environment?
    Mr Bowles, send the money back.
    eb

  2. Fed Up LCSW

    April 17, 2009 at 7:59 pm

    Gillings turned UNC into a painted and powdered floozy who, when the light of days shines bright, is revealed for the shill for the biggest con game in town–yes, almost as big as the Derivative Devils. Slap some serious regukations on the pharmaceutical industry and there will be no healthcare cost crisis. Gillings is just trying to hedge his bets because the game coming down the pike is going to put serious brakes on the money shoveling he and his ilk are getting away with. “Greedy” and “shameless” are well deserved attributes, eb. Mr. Bowles, send the bribes back to the circle of hell from whence they issued.

  3. Fed Up LCSW

    April 17, 2009 at 8:01 pm

    That would be “regulations” if I were not regurgitating in disgust.

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