Uncategorized

Exploring some hard truths

This week’s Friday Report
from the Public School Forum of North Carolina has some good stuff that’s worth your attention. First and foremost is an article that explores some of the hard realities about SAT scores. Consider the following:

The release of SAT scores this week attracted little attention. Average scores in North Carolina dropped 1 point from last year; national scores also dropped one point. While North Carolina has moved from near the bottom (48th out of 50 states in 1990) to only 10 points below average, the State remains below average in almost all categories – ethnic comparisons, income comparisons, etc. Albeit, it has made larger SAT gains than all but one other state in the union.

If one digs deeper into SAT test-taking results, however, one finds patterns that raise disturbing questions about education’s ability to pull all young people up to higher levels of achievement.

The Department of Public Instruction’s 2009 SAT Report graphically presents data that has become depressingly repetitive. When one breaks down the scores of SAT test takers, race, parental education levels and parental income in almost all cases are accurate predictors of how young people will fare on the test widely used to determine college admission.

With very few exceptions, the demographics of a school system’s population mirror the SAT scores of test takers.”

As the article, notes (and Chris Fitzsimon has written on numerous occasions) the overriding predictor of school performance is the household and neighborhood from which a child hails. Ignoring broader issues like poverty, health care, etc… is an invitation to continued struggles from poor kids in our public schools.

The newsletter also includes an outstanding letter regarding the ongoing debate over Wake County’s economic diversity program and the ways in which Wake continually bests Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s recently re-segregated schools.

Check Also

BREAKING: New analysis shows GOP tax plan would be “devastating” to North Carolina nonprofits

This is usually the time of year during ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

The controversy over “Silent Sam,” the Confederate monument on UNC’s Chapel Hill campus, has been ra [...]

North Carolina tries to mine its swine and deal with a poop problem that keeps piling up A blanket o [...]

This story is part of "Peak Pig," an examination of the hog industry co-published with Env [...]

Few issues in the North Carolina’s contentious policy wars have been more consistently front and cen [...]

Five years ago, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a jaw-dropping civil rights lawsuit again [...]

Will Burr and Tillis really vote for this? For much of the 20th Century, one of the labels that Amer [...]

President Trump and Congressional Republicans aim to rebrand enormous tax cuts for the wealthiest ho [...]

20—number of years since a bipartisan coalition in Congress passed the Children’s Health Insurance P [...]

Spotlight on Journalism

We invite you to join a special celebration of investigative journalism! The evening will feature Mike Rezendes, a member of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Boston Globe Spotlight Team known for their coverage of the cover-up of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

Tickets available NOW!

Spotlight On Journalism

This event will benefit NC Policy Watch, a project of the North Carolina Justice Center. Sponsorship opportunities available now!

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more