Glenn Beck is my co-pilot

Glenn Beck, the seemingly unstable Fox personality, is leading the push against health reform.

Sure, Americans for the Prosperous are doing the dutiful bidding of their corporate funders, but Beck is driving the opposition. He asked for people to have kitchen table conversations presumably to make up new provisions that aren’t in Congressional health care proposals and right wingers heeded the call.

At nearly every town hall I attended across North Carolina at least a few people — oftentimes the same people at multiple town halls — would wear Beck’s “9-12 Project” or “We Surround Them” t-shirts.

This weekend, Sept. 12, is the big Beck-sponsored rally in Washington D.C. to keep average people sick and insurance companies healthy. Why Sept. 12? Because Beck wants America to revert back to the way it was after Sept. 11, 2001, when many people were scared, paranoid, distrustful of others, and vengeful.

I have tuned in to Beck’s show occasionally because it’s like a High School talent show gone awry. But just as I start feeling painfully embarrassed for Beck, I remember that he’s actually a pretty influential and wealthy guy.

Now Beck has convinced a sizable chunk of North Carolina’s population that keeping his ratings up and maintaining his wealth are more important than eliminating preexisting conditions or improving access to health care for children.

It’s hard to believe that anyone in my home state would allow a television commentator in New York City to mislead them into opposing important reforms to our health care system. But there you have it — on Sept. 12 some of our fellow North Carolinians will be there in DC cheering on Beck. I’m glad the health care industry has someone fighting for their interests in this debate.

4 Comments

  1. IBXer

    September 9, 2009 at 11:13 am

    You’re just angry he got Van Jones fired.

  2. AdamL

    September 9, 2009 at 3:49 pm

    As countless studies have shown mandates have almost nothing to do with the increasing costs of health care. Also, the reform proposals in Congress do not establish a federal health care monopoly, they create exchanges to foster competition, and the Senate HELP bill establishes those exchanges at the state level.

  3. Adam Linker

    September 9, 2009 at 5:19 pm

    First, CAHI won’t release it’s methodology. Second, CAHI itself says you can’t just add up the costs as you’re doing.

    See here: http://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2008/10/31/mccrory-fudges-the-numbers/

    I’m not sure what you mean by “It out prices its competitors and essentially ruins them.” What out prices its competitors? Are you referring to the public option? In the Senate HELP bill it’s priced the same as private insurance.

    And I’m not sure what “Obama-care” is. There is legislation in the House and Senate and Obama didn’t write any of it.

  4. AdamL

    September 10, 2009 at 9:47 am

    Obviously I can’t argue with your keen mathematical mind.