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Plenty for Blue Cross, None for Me

YouTube Preview Image We need health care reform with a public health insurance option now. Someone needs to cover people who are denied coverage and claims.

13 Comments

  1. IBXer

    September 23, 2009 at 9:34 am

    Another fine example of why no one is taking the left seriously on this issue. You guys choose to make jokes and bad songs about something that most people do not find humorous. Absurdity might play well when debating war, which is in itself absurd in many ways. You’re using the same tactics to try to win a completely different argument.

  2. gregflynn

    September 23, 2009 at 9:46 am

    BCBS is a metaphor for the health insurance industry. It works for some. It doesn’t work for others. Denial of coverage (or sky high premiums) for pre-existing conditions and rescission practices still leave people out in the cold. BCBS is actively opposed to health care reform that would cover those people. BCBSNC also has some explaining to do about the State Health Plan.

  3. IBXer

    September 23, 2009 at 10:37 am

    The NYT has an article that contradicts virtually every claim you guys have ever made on this site regarding healthcare…

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/22/science/22tier.html?em

  4. AdamL

    September 23, 2009 at 11:04 am

    Wow, citing Samuel Preston and linking to an NYT story — color me impressed.

    I don’t think the health care system is the main culprit affecting our life expectancy. We die more violent deaths and we’re fairly unhealthy, although there is a lot of debate about how much more unhealthy we are.

    Mortality is not much different internationally and survival rates are unhelpful as a comparative measure.

    My primary concern is exactly what Preston says he does not address:

    “Evidence that the major diseases are effectively diagnosed and treated in the US does not mean that there may not be great inefficiencies in the US health care system. A list of prominent charges include fragmentation, duplication, inaccessibility of records, the practice of defensive medicine, misalignment of physician and patient incentives, limitations of access for a large fraction of the population, and excessively fast adoption of unproven technologies . . .

    Just as we are not addressing issues of efficiency on the production side, we are not treating patient welfare as the main outcome. Practices that produce greater longevity do not necessarily enhance well-being. This potential disparity is central to the controversy involving PSA testing, which uncovers many cancers that would never kill patients but whose treatment often produces adverse side effects.”

  5. gregflynn

    September 23, 2009 at 11:16 am

    That’s a stretch. The article says that Americans are fatter, sicker and die younger that people in other countries but that the people that do get treatment get good treatment. No news there. The problem is with the people who get good treatment and are burdened with debt when they are least able to generate revenue or those who don’t get treatment and lead less productive lives. We need a system that encourages more primary care and covers people that clog expensive emergency rooms with preventable conditions.

  6. Adam Searing

    September 23, 2009 at 11:31 am

    All one has to do is go around North Carolina and listen to story after story of the individuals and businesses who can’t afford to buy health coverage. Then you realize that reform is critical.

  7. IBXer

    September 23, 2009 at 12:14 pm

    AdamL, do you honestly, and I mean sincerely, believe that the government can make anything run more efficiently? If so, you truly are 1 in a million, my friend.

    I encourage you to read this article. This is an amazing article about the inefficiency of healthcare in the US, it’s root causes, and solutions.

    How American Health Care Killed My Father – by David Goldhill
    http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200909/health-care

  8. AdamL

    September 23, 2009 at 12:36 pm

    I’ve read Goldhill’s article. Some of it is interesting. Some of it is a bit misinformed. And some of it is just wrong. Not much new in it.

  9. Jack

    September 23, 2009 at 5:32 pm

    In case you missed it the song represents a reality. Where’s the absurdity in that? Again, when truth is presented there are those who refuse to see it much less acknowledge it. It’s call holding fast to an ideology rather than reality.

  10. IBXer

    September 24, 2009 at 9:21 am

    It’s absurd because you have an aged hippy wannabe who can’t let go of 1969 making a mockery out of a subject that is very serious to billions of people by performing a “protest” song against something with a “big” prefix.

    It’s impossible to take anything you guys say seriously.

  11. Jack

    September 24, 2009 at 11:38 am

    A very 1960s anti-hippy point of view that is reflective of a stagnate world view and belief in an ideology rather than reality. Seriously.

  12. IBXer

    September 24, 2009 at 2:13 pm

    Jack, it is the left that is refusing to accept that it is no longer 1969 and still trying to fight the same old battles…

  13. IBXer

    September 24, 2009 at 2:17 pm

    Jack, it is the left that is refusing to accept that it is no longer 1969 and still trying to fight the same old battles with the same old antics.

    Seriously, just grow up.

    “A very 1960s anti-hippy point of view that is reflective of a stagnate world view and belief in an ideology rather than reality. Seriously.”

    You still rebelling against your parents?