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Mixed messages on health reform from reactionary business groups

imagesHealth reform is dead according to several business groups known for opposing everything that is good and just in our society.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the National Retail Federation, and the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council say comprehensive changes won’t pass this year.

Really?

Then the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council should stop sending out petitions and press releases about trying to kill health reform. If it’s dead, stop bothering.

The group sent out a statement on Sept. 25 that began:

Health care bills are moving through Congress that include new taxes and mandates on small business owners.

So now the bills are moving again? I’m confused.

On Sept. 24 the National Retail Federation sent out a statement that began:

The National Retail Federation today asked the Senate Finance Committee to reject an amendment to its health care reform bill that would replace the measure’s conditional “free rider” employer mandate with a full-scale pay-or-play employer mandate approved this summer by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

And the U.S. Chamber is releasing information every day and is mobilizing against an “employer mandate.”

Why do these groups care what’s written on a dead letter? This thing is gone. Call off the lobbyists. Ever day Americans will take it from here.

2 Comments


  1. IBXer

    September 29, 2009 at 10:05 am

    It is.

    Rasmussen: Support for health care at new low (56 disapprove, 41 approve)
    Rasmussen Reports ^ | September 28, 2009 | Scott Rasmussen

    Just 41% of voters nationwide now favor the health care reform proposed by President Obama and congressional Democrats. That’s down two points from a week ago and the lowest level of support yet measured.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 56% are opposed to the plan.

    Senior citizens are less supportive of the plan than younger voters. In the latest survey, just 33% of seniors favor the plan while 59% are opposed. The intensity gap among seniors is significant. Only 16% of the over-65 crowd Strongly Favors the legislation while 46% are Strongly Opposed.

    For the first time ever, a slight plurality of voters now express doubt that the legislation will become law this year. Forty-six percent (46%) say passage is likely while 47% say it is not. Those figures include 18% who say passage is Very Likely and 15% who say it is Not at All Likely. Sixty percent (60%) are less certain.

  2. IBXer

    September 29, 2009 at 12:19 pm

    It is for reasons like this, that people do not trust the government to run healthcare.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/29/us/politics/29reid.html?_r=2&ref=todayspaper

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