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78 million for public option and 54 million opposed in Senate Finance Committee

So that’s not really how our representative system works, and you can only take the logic so far.

But it’s striking that the Democrats holding up a public option in the Senate Finance Committee — Max Baucus of Montana, Kent Conrad of North Dakota, and Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas — are from states with a combined population of about 4.5 million. Heck, if North Dakota and Montana made up a single city it wouldn’t equal the population of Charlotte.

Democrats voting for a public option in the Senate Finance Committee represent states with a combined population of 78 million. Even if you add in the Republicans voting against a public option you only get 54 million — and that’s mostly Texas.

I don’t think this was fully explained in School House Rock!

5 Comments


  1. Mad As Hell Doctors

    September 30, 2009 at 2:03 pm

    time for protests outside health insurance offices and pharmaceutical companies

  2. Democracy Now!

    September 30, 2009 at 2:09 pm

    17 Arrested at Insurance Company Offices

    As the Finance Committee held its session, seventeen people were arrested at the New York offices of the insurance giant Aetna. The activists linked arms and chanted slogans “People Not Profits, Medicare for All.” The action was the first in a campaign by the group Mobilization for Health Care for All to hold sit-ins at insurance company offices nationwide. Group member Mark Milano spoke out after the arrests were made.

    Mark Milano: “We’re just here because of the many people we know who die because insurance companies put profits before people’s care. The myths about government death panels are a lie. The reality is that the deaths panels are the people who are paid every day to deny care to people. That’s their job. The more people they deny care to, the bigger bonuses they get. We are here to say that we will not rest until every person who needs care in America gets it, and the way to get that care for everyone is Medicare for all.”

  3. Eminem Toy Soldiers

    September 30, 2009 at 3:56 pm

    What has happened to obamas health care bill? The one he has never read or had anything to do with its writing,yet has wasted millions on pushing.

  4. Louie

    September 30, 2009 at 5:38 pm

    Absent a public option or single payer, under BaucusCare are Americans going to be threatened with jail time and huge fines for refusing to buy health insurance?

  5. Aaron Dunn

    September 30, 2009 at 5:52 pm

    My concern with this health care reform, as an Independent, is that it’s all over the place, there are not enough specifics and it must be put into writing and as if “written in stone” so that not every illegal that comes to the US will get free healthcare and those that work hard all their citizen life in US pay for every “Tom, Dick and Harry”

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