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Bush years ended on a real high note

More news today about the impact of eight years of casino capitalism in the White House (and in a mostly complicit Congress) – this is from today’s Washington Post:

The number of Americans who lack dependable access to adequate food shot up last year to 49 million, the largest number since the government has been keeping track, according to a federal report released Monday that shows particularly steep increases in food scarcity among families with children.

In 2008, the report found, nearly 17 million children — more than one in five across the United States — were living in households in which food at times ran short, up from slightly more than 12 million youngsters the year before. And the number of children who sometimes were outright hungry rose from nearly 700,000 to almost 1.1 million. ”

You can see the whole sobering U.S. Department of Agriculture report (PDF), here.

Heckuva job, Dubya!

5 Comments


  1. Rob Schofield

    November 16, 2009 at 4:00 pm

    North Carolina’s numbers went up too. From 2003-05, an average of 13.1% of North Carolinians had low or very low food security. For 2006-’08 the number was 13.7%.Only eight states had a higher (i.e. worse) overall percentage in ’06-’08.

  2. Adam

    November 16, 2009 at 6:47 pm

    Isn’t it the God wrath, well if you believe on such things?
    Bush and neo cons created a phony war against most poor people in the world killing thousands of innocent women and children who were already the poorest of the poor in both Iraq and Afghanistan. There were no WMDs and Osama was never caugth. Lies and deception of a nation’s leader resulted in the wrath of God to its people because they supported him. No matter how super you become there is a super being watching over your deeds.

  3. Rob Schofield

    November 17, 2009 at 8:42 am

    Seems like it would be better if the wrath were directed at the people who caused the mess rather than at hungry children.

  4. IBXer

    November 17, 2009 at 9:02 am

    This is pure ignorance on display.

    The US was not a “casino capitalist” country during the last decade. It has been a corporate welfare state for the past 75 years. If the poor were hungry, it is because government failed, not the make-believe free markets.

    Look at the article you posted again and take note of the chart which shows a huge jump in hunger in 2008. This is the same year that Bush tried to veto a farm bill that paid $30 billion to farmers to NOT grow food.

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-05-21-bush-farmbill_N.htm

    The Democratic controlled Congress promoted this bill as a means to feed the poor (and bring money to their districts during an election year). How very kind of them.

  5. gregflynn

    November 17, 2009 at 2:03 pm

    There is no shortage of food in the US. 17 million kids have problems accessing it.

    Bush vetoed the 2008 Farm Bill knowing that Republicans would help override it. He signed a similar bill in 2002 when Republicans controlled Congress.

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