Greenville vote gives reform momentum

Last night, the Greenville City Council voted to ask the North Carolina General Assembly for the right to explore voter-owned elections at the local level. The city joins Wilmington (February) and Raleigh (January) in adopting such a measure.

Voter-owned elections are a proven method of dislodging special interest money from the political process, and empowering citizen participation in democracy. The idea is that candidates should get their campaign money from small donors in their constituency, as well as a public fund, rather than soliciting big money contributions that often come with strings attached.

In 2009, the Town of Chapel Hill became the first community east of the Mississippi to conduct a voter-owned election; the top 2 vote-getters were both voter-owned.

Currently, cities must ask the state for special permission even to consider campaign reform. But with more and more communities joining the chorus for change, the legislature has every reason to grant them reform authority in the upcoming short session.

3 Comments

  1. Emma

    March 3, 2010 at 10:48 am

    I wonder, would this measure have stopped Wake County from electing current school board?

  2. Chase

    March 3, 2010 at 11:13 am

    Considering that the anti-diversity board received lots of money both directly and indirectly from right-wing barons including Art Pope, a robust, VOE program for school board could have leveled the playing field some. But even more importantly, the qualifying contribution requirements would have forced all candidates to spend more time going door to door, building grassroots support. And that might have given the pro-diversity candidates more tools to respond to their well-organized, anti-diversity challengers.

  3. IBXer

    March 3, 2010 at 12:53 pm

    Of course they voted for it. It is nothing but an incumbent protection scheme.