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Lottery officials respond

Last week, NC Policy Watch published the first report in our new series Policy Watch Investigates. Since that time, lottery spokesperson Van Denton has requested an opportunity to offer an official response.

We’re happy to accommodate this request.

Policy Watch stands by the report, and we look forward to the continued discussion on the lottery, as well as how to best fund education in our state.

Read below for Denton’s statement:

A recent report by the N.C. Policy Watch, “Scratch and Shift: Lottery giving education smaller share,”  is based on a flawed assumption that the amount of money paid out in prizes to players of the N.C. Education Lottery does not have a direct correlation to the amount of overall revenues that is raised. Both the experience here in North Carolina and in other states with successful lotteries demonstrate that higher payout in prizes results in higher sales. In fiscal year 2008, when the instant ticket prize payout changed in North Carolina, instant ticket sales increased by 79 percent from the first to the last half of year. The N.C. Lottery Act directs the N.C. Lottery Commission to allocate its revenues “to increase and maximize the available revenues for educational purposes.” The Policy Watch report assumes that sales do not change with a drop in prize payouts and then applies a 35 percent guideline to revenues resulting from the higher prize payout. The report ignores the correlation between prize payout and sales. The extra $80 million that the report claims for education would not have existed if sales had not grown due to the larger payout in prizes.

In the end you can’t spend percentages on behalf of education. You can spend dollars. The math is actually pretty simple. Which does better for education? Deliver a 35 percent return from $866 million in sales, as we did in fiscal year 2007? Or deliver a 30 percent from $1.424 billion in sales as we did in fiscal year 2010? Here’s another way to look at it. Think of a pie. If you have made a bigger pie, which the Education Lottery has, then the slice is not smaller, it’s larger. We’ve increased the amount of money going to education. That’s what’s important.

6 Comments


  1. Bill

    September 28, 2010 at 4:30 pm

    But, wouldn’t it be even better to have 35% $1.424 billion instead of 30%? Just asking!

  2. James

    September 28, 2010 at 6:37 pm

    What an idiot. He thinks he’s talking to moron Republicans who don’t know how to use a calculator.

  3. Alex

    September 28, 2010 at 9:34 pm

    Everything has to be explained to Democrats who have trouble with numbers !

  4. chuck

    September 28, 2010 at 11:31 pm

    The press stands by their story? That it is better to make less money but a higher percentage? How about the lottery return 99% of sales? Try using 1% of sales for prizes, advertising, staff, etc. Wow! Think of it. A 99% return. This ain’t rocket science folks.

  5. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by 4 All Betting, Mary Cala. Mary Cala said: Lottery officials respond: Both the experience here in North Carolina and in other states with successful lotterie… http://bit.ly/92FZz8 […]

  6. Joe Ciulla

    September 29, 2010 at 7:48 pm

    James,
    Those “moron Republicans” you mention were against the lottery to begin with. Really, how can you go through this world thinking that 1/3 of the country (Republicans) are evil, stupid and praise the ground that Art Pope walks on.
    I think there are some good ideas that Democrats bring to the table, and some good ideas from Republicans. When you assume that any politician who is not a Democrat is worthless, then assume that any Democratic politician who is not “progressive” enough for you is worthless, then you end up with a real short list of people you want to vote for. Take the blinders off, there’s a big world out there and it is full of great ideas.

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