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The Governor’s recommendations in criminal justice

(Cross-posted from Legislative Watch).

Those looking for a useful summary of the Governor’s budet proposals in the world of criminal justice should defnitely check out the latest Carolina Justice Policy Center Legislative Update.

The update provides a helpful overview of the subject and lots of specific details. It also includes a brief and insightful piece on the legislative debate surrounding nonprofits (legislative Republicans are focusing a great deal of scrutiny on the mostly small nonprofits that provide a lot of core state services).

Let’s hope leaders pay particular attention to this paragraph:

If there is a general perception that non-profits are somehow not a good use of state dollars, nothing could be further from the truth.  High functioning non-profits bring in volunteers, community partners, and funds from additional sources – all at wages and benefits that are frequently less than those paid to state employees.”  

3 Comments


  1. JeffS

    February 18, 2011 at 10:54 am

    As usual, the first things to go are the transition programs with a proven record of success.

    On the positive side, it took a budget crunch to do away with the double-celling policy.

  2. Carolina Cannabis Coalition

    February 18, 2011 at 3:04 pm

    the new Obama adm. budget continues an overreliance on incarceration. More @

    http://www.justicepolicy.org/content-hmID=1811&smID=1581&ssmID=111.htm

  3. Carolina Cannabis Coalition

    February 18, 2011 at 3:05 pm

    Budget Wrongly Invests in Policing and Prisons Not Prevention and Communities

    Justice advocates disturbed by proposed $28 billion for expensive, ineffective and unfair policies

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