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Wake School Board’s Defense of End to Socioeconomic Integration Policy Filled with Holes

Eric Houk and Sheneka Williams, two of the very small handful of researchers cited in the Wake School Board’s response to the NAACP’s Title VI complaint to the Office of Civil Rights, wrote a letter to the News and Observer today protesting that  they were misinterpreted in the response.  The Wake School Board used comments made by the researchers to support the proposition the former socioeconomic integration policy was not sound educational policy.  The researchers felt strongly enough about the misinterpretation to respond publicly.  Their letter clarifies their position on the issue, stating that “our review of the literature on within-district resource allocation and student-level peer effects indicates that the existence of racially and socioeconomically isolated schools creates significant challenges for educators.”

This comes on the heels of a report yesterday which highlighted the misuse of busing statistics in the response.  The Board’s attorneys were forced to write a letter to the Office of Civil Rights to correct this error.

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