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Charter schools: Not built for the long haul?

The Los Angeles Times had an interesting story yesterday about the high rate of teacher turnover in L.A.’s fast growing charter schools. It sounds like confirmation of what many critics have long said is a key objective of/problem with charters — privatizing education means replicating the corporate model of constantly trying to pay workers less and work them longer hours.

This is hardly the recipe for addressing what ails our public schools.

 

3 Comments


  1. JeffS

    July 26, 2011 at 1:30 pm

    I’m not sure that turnover has much significance for me. As long as they’re staying through the year, what “stability” does a teacher down the hall bring to a kid?

    Interesting was the glimpse into corporate schools and some of the changes that brings. I have to wonder what the reactions of some of the locals would be in this situation – the ones arguing for local schools and smaller govt. lately. How would they feel if their local school closed so the corporation could make more money that year?

    Maybe I’m cynical, but I don’t expect corporate schools to be able to feed off the motivation the young for very long.

  2. Shabazz

    July 26, 2011 at 3:02 pm

    I didn’t see any quotes from any teachers that supported the theory that the high rate of turnover is due to this “corporate model.”

  3. william

    July 26, 2011 at 6:12 pm

    Wow…. what we do no is traditional public schools have failed our kids for year and years. It’s amazing that the people who have failed have so much to say.

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