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More than 2,700 N.C. educators lost jobs, DPI finds (with Top 10 list of hardest-hit counties)

Remember those claims from legislative leaders about how no classroom teachers would lose their jobs as a result of budget cuts?

Well, 847 of them did, according to numbers just released by the N.C. Department of Public Instruction.

A total of 2,723 educators received pink slips from the budget cuts at the state level for the 2010-11 school year, according to data the school districts submitted to the state. Those figures offer the most comprehensive look at what this year’s state budget did to classrooms.

Duplin and Guilford counties did not submit their data to DPI.

This year’s batch of laid-off teachers adds to significant cuts made in other years, and as school enrollment goes up each year.

For this upcoming year (the 10-11 fiscal year), teachers at the K-12 level made up 31 percent of the lay-offs, with teachers assistants accounting for nearly half (48 percent) of all the lay-offs statewide in public educaiton.

Some schools may have started their lay-offs earlier, and the state found that 2,556 people were given pink slips and laid off in the previous fiscal year.

Here are the 10 counties with the biggest losses in this fiscal year:

  1. Charlotte-Mecklenburg got rid of 530 people (313 were classroom teachers and 102 teachers assistants)
  2.  Cumberland County, 282 total people (125 teachers, 157 teachers assistants).
  3. Johnston County, 167.5 total (30.5 teachers and 115 teacher assistants).
  4. (Tied) Burke County, 147 total, (82 teachers and 52 teacher assistants).
  5. (Tied) Gaston County, 147 total, (72 teachers and 26 teachers assistants).
  6.  Robeson County, 135 people. (135 teacher assistants)
  7. Scotland County, 121 people (28 teachers, 85 teacher assistants).
  8. Buncombe County, 95.5 positions. 7.5 teachers, 75 teacher assistants).
  9. Wake County, 95 people (no teachers or teacher assistants, all cuts in central office and other staff).
  10. Lincoln County, 77 people (10 teachers, 61 teacher assistants).

Source: N.C. DPI

To see the data for yourself, go here and download the DPI spreadsheet.

2 Comments


  1. Somewhat hasty...

    August 31, 2011 at 11:35 pm

    The Charlotte numbers were way, way off in the initial report.
    CMS’s hiring spree was pretty well documented-of course if you are trying to make the GOP leadership look bad, why wait to make sweeping conclusions?

  2. Frances Jenkins

    September 2, 2011 at 12:26 am

    After all is said and done, what is the real truth? I heard DPI was coming out with a real number of less than 1,000.

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