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Tedesco’s group files some papers; still no work product

A couple of weeks back, we reported that the North Carolina Center for Education Reform — the group formed by conservative Wake County school board member John Tedesco — had not produced a single piece of public work product (other than a generic website) during its first three months of operation.

Now,  it appears there’s been a major breakthrough: Tedesco’s group has actually appointed a board and approved a budget! 

Shortly after the Secretary of State’s office mailed a letter stating that the group’s application for licensure as a charitable organization was being denied for failure to file necessary documents, Tedesco apparently got on the stick and filed several things last week. They include: a list of board members, an “annual financial report form,” a budget and some more generic documents about the group.  You can review each of these documents by clicking here.

And he’s apparently hiring (or has hired). According to Tedesco’s budget, the staff now features three people — a $1680/month office manager (sure hope that’s part-time), a $2,200/month “program associate” (ditto) and himself as a $6,000/month “President/CEO.” 

It looks like it won’t be long until we’ll be inundated with all manner of cutting-edge research and analysis. Stay tuned.

(Special thanks to Progressive Pulse contributor Greg Flynn for pointing out this exciting news.)

 

 

 

3 Comments


  1. jlp75

    October 3, 2011 at 10:33 am

    Please stay on top of this Policy Watch. It seems suspicious that he is getting $6000 a month and has yet to produce.

  2. JeffS

    October 3, 2011 at 1:03 pm

    jlp, I’m not sure that “producing” is the point. He’s already produced, this is payment for the work that he and others have already put in, and to keep them working.

    The list of board members is an interesting read… a collection of republican activists, most with an agenda of reducing funding for public education and privatizing as many systems as they can.

    John might have been something one upon a time, but now he’s just a mouthpiece. We should all stop talking about any “production” from him, however facetiously.

  3. jlp75

    October 3, 2011 at 1:41 pm

    Jeff I agree but I think what I am getting at is that if this money is in fact payment for what he has already produced (i.e. his work on the school board) I would think this would be in violation of some law. It seems at a minimum a failure to report campaign contributions, but I’m no lawyer. I am just a concerned citizen who thinks school board members should not be for sale. I think to keep this above board and legal some type of work needs to be produced from this organization or else special interests are just paying him to be on the school board. Surely that would not be legal. If it is we have a seriously broken system.

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