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Ridiculous blame game on failed incentives deal

You simply can’t read the details of the story (and associated documents and statements) of the failed “Project Soccer” negotiations in which the Perdue administration and Republican legislative leaders attempted to coax (i.e. bribe) Continental Tire to locate a plant in Wilmington without wanting to throw your hands up in disgust.

The only thing that’s worse than the record of the whole sodid process is the absurd blame game that the parties are now playing. Especially high on the unctuousness meter: the holier-than-thou claims of Senate leader Phil Berger (who jetted off to China on a so-called trade mission in the midst of the negotiations) that he was shocked (shocked!) to learn that powerful insiders stood to gain from the deal.

Perdue and her staff deserve plenty of blame for the whole mess, but Berger and his buddy, Speaker Thom Tillis, are trying to have it  both ways by participating in the whole process for weeks on end and then claiming at the last minute that they had all sorts of reservations from the beginning. It’s enough to make you think that they never intended to let Perdue have such a political victory, but just played along until they could figure out a way to scuttle it.

5 Comments


  1. jlp75

    October 6, 2011 at 5:49 pm

    I am sure if their buddies stood to profit they wouldn’t have had a problem with it.

  2. Frances Jenkins

    October 6, 2011 at 7:48 pm

    Could the story read the company was afraid Perdue’ son and Perdue’s Democrat friends brought serious ethical questions to the project and the group went to SC. The huge political contributions to Perdue campaign by the major Democrat players and the involvement of the Governor’s son was certain to raise major questions, possible illegal activity.

  3. david esmay

    October 7, 2011 at 9:12 am

    Frances, do you mean like passing legislation that allows companies, like Variety Wholesalers for instance, to move their profits out of state for tax purposes? The same big time farmer that owned the land also benifited from repub legislation that moved environmental protections under the jurisdiction of the Agriculture dept. Given the state’s economic situation, both parties seem willing to throw ethics out the door, but illegal, no. Since the repubs were a part of the negotiations, Berger was well aware of all the parties involved. Had it involved a conservative benefactor, they’d be crying that they were just trying to bring jobs to the state. In any transaction, someone’s going to make money.

  4. jlp75

    October 7, 2011 at 11:56 am

    I guess profit is only good when it goes into a Republican pocket.

  5. Gary B

    October 7, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    Frances, (it’s “Democratic”, not “Democrat” and it isn’t just them), you and jlp (no, jlp, it isn’t just the Replublicans) need to read it again. It’s ALL OF THEM.

    We all need to stand up and take our government back from big business.

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