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Civil rights pioneer joins Marriage Equality campaign

Civil rights pioneer and NAACP Chairman Emeritus Julian Bond has teamed up with the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) for its Americans for Marriage Equality initiative.

Bond, who has long been a critic of marriage discrimination, is also lending his voice to support the recognition of same-sex marriage in Maryland in 2012.

In North Carolina, voters will decide next May whether or not to endorse a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage.

According to Public Policy Polling, 61 percent of North Carolina voters say they support the amendment “defining marriage as between a man and a woman” but 51 percent of those same voters also believe there should be legal recognition for same-sex couples.

PPP also noted last month those fighting to defeat the amendment in North Carolina need to reach out to black Democrats. 70% of them support the amendment, whereas white Democrats oppose the amendment by a 57/37 margin.

To view Julian Bond’s video spot, click below:

3 Comments


  1. Dave

    November 1, 2011 at 4:34 pm

    The wording of the NC amendment bears close scrutiny: “Marriage between one man and one woman is the only DOMESTIC LEGAL UNION that shall be valid or recognized IN this State. This section does not prohibit a private party from entering into contracts with another private party; nor does this section prohibit courts from adjudicating the rights of private parties pursuant to such contracts.” (Caps are mine, added for emphasis.) The amendment not only prohibits recognition of same-gender marriage, but also prohibits recognition of civil unions and domestic partnerships, precluding the granting of even minimal benefits/rights/and protections to same-gender couples for the foreseeable future. And because the amendment is not restricted to recognition “by” the state, but instead imposes prohibitions “in” the state, it looks as though it also prohibits granting of any benefits to same-gender couples even by those local government entities that already do so. There is even debate as to whether the second sentence of the amendment is sufficient to allow private companies to grant spousal benefits to partners in same-gender benefits. This amendment is not only a reiteration of North Carolina’s current discriminatory laws … it is actually a step backwards that will strip some NC same-gender couples of benefits that they are currently receiving.

  2. Mike P.

    November 1, 2011 at 8:19 pm

    Have black voters in any state signified that they think ought to vote however Mr. Bond tells them? They voted 70% for the Florida and California amendments in 2008. Expect something similar in NC. Most have never bought the comparison with interracial marriage, and that will continue.

  3. wayne

    November 1, 2011 at 9:27 pm

    Julian….I think you just taught me what a real Hero is all about! Thank you !

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