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Small businesses oppose Citizens United decision

Tomorrow is the second anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s disastrous Citizens United ruling that bestowed free speech rights on corporations. As noted here yesterday, the date is sparking a bevy of protests and other actions around North Carolina that should draw a large number of citizen activists.

Lest, however, one get the impression that it’s only the unwashed masses who oppose the dark turn in American politics that the Court’s decision introduced, check out this morning’s Link of the Day from the good people at Democracy-North Carolina highlighting new national poll results that show small business owners oppose the ruling and its impacts as well:

“Small Biz Opposes CU Decision

A trio of small business federations today released a survey showing that two thirds of small business owners across the nation believe the Citizens United decision gives big corporations an unfair advantage over them. The Supreme Court decision from January 2010 allows businesses to spend unlimited amounts from their treasury to tell people how to vote. “America’s entrepreneurs feel corporations have an outsized role and say in politics to the detriment of the small business community,” said John Arensmeyer, founder and CEO of Small Business Majority. The Supreme Court’s narrow 5-to-4 majority said campaign spending doesn’t win corporations political friends, or intimidate their enemies, because it must be “independent” of the candidate and can not be given directly to the candidate’s campaign. “Small business owners aren’t stupid,” countered Melanie Collins, owner of Melanie’s Home Childcare in Falmouth, Maine. “We know who wins when corporate heavy hitters can spend all the money they want, as secretively as they want, to influence our country’s elections – and it’s not us.” The survey also shows that by a margin of 7-to-1, small business owners think money plays a negative role in politics.”

 

One Comment


  1. david esmay

    January 23, 2012 at 10:32 am

    This ruling is going to bite us in the butt for decades. Activist judge Anthony Scalia stated that if you don’t like the barrage of ads as a result of the unleashing of an endless supply of corporate money into politics, “Turn the channel”. What Scalia and the four other SCOTUS members who wrote this legal piece of crap failed to acknowledge is that corporations do not speak with one mind. They are made up of employees and stockholders who donnot share the same views. Therefore when a corporation contributes to a political campaign or a super-pac, it’s not the corporation making those donations, but the people who are temporarily in charge of that corporation. They are in effect, using the monetary power of the corporation to further their own personal aims.

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