Uncategorized

Needed: Money for textbooks, teachers and extra school days

The big news coming out of today and tomorrow’s N.C. State Board of Education meeting will be whether the board gives nine proposed charter schools the green light to open this fall (Read an earlier post for more information on that).

But the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, like most state agencies and entities, is also gearing for the budget season, and have prepared a list of “must have” items for the N.C. General Assembly.

The education agency estimates it needs $633 million on top of the $7.4 billion the GOP-led legislature gave them last year for the 2012-13 budget.

The board will vote this afternoon on whether to forward the request on to the budget team for Gov. Bev Perdue, who has made no secret that she’ll spend her remaining time left in office fighting to get education funding back up.

On the list (click here to see for yourself) are:

  • $503 million to restore discretionary funding to the local education agencies (that cut is where schools had to lay off more than 500 teachers and 1,200 teacher assistants)
  • $7.5 million for 8th, 9th, 10th and 11th graders to take various tests, including the required ACT for high school juniors
  • $1.1 million for the N.C. Governor’s School (the summer program was cut completely and saved only by donations this summer)
  • $20 million to boost the school lunch programs; $14.6 million for the five extra school days legislators demanded but didn’t fund
  • $76.5 million to restore cuts to textbooks and learning materials statewide
  • $200,000 to add staff to the existing four-person Office of Charter Schools that’s supposed to oversee curriculum, governance and budgets for all 100 existing charters and the dozens more that will be added now that the cap on charter schools has lifted.

 

We’ll update to let you know what the State Board of Education decided to do. Or follow reporter Sarah Ovaska on Twitter at @SarahOvaska.

 

3 Comments


  1. david esmay

    February 29, 2012 at 2:02 pm

    Add fuel to that list, for my daughter’s field trip this morning, parents had to pony up money for diesel. 1st graders now have to pass the hat like a bunch teenagers at a kegger to get to the Environmental Center in Greensboro. For the life of me, I cannot remember one instance in school that my parents had to pay for any field trip. We even got free bus rides to the state wrestling and girls and boys basketball tournaments every year. NC needs to wake up, instead of striving for the bottom, states like Iowa, with a repub governor and legislature increase spending on education every year, and reap the dividends.

  2. Jimmy

    March 1, 2012 at 7:59 am

    When you were growing up david, we weren’t $ 16 TRILLION in debt either, and increasing by $ 1.3 TRILLION a year !

  3. Fayaz

    March 14, 2012 at 3:43 am

    The corporate ed rerofm powers that be who supported all the incumbents (including the Seattle Times, which prematurely declared one of the losing incumbents the winner) are not happy, and have tried to dismiss the victories as solely due to teacher’s union support, or disparage voters as simply being silly.

Check Also

UNC Board of Governors face protest, chooses new board chair and interim president

It was a busy day at the final ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Conference comes a day after new report lauds benefits of same-day registration The new line-up for [...]

North Carolina’s largest public school system may be warning of “enormous disruptions” without speed [...]

Carol Turner hadn’t lived in North Carolina long before last November’s election. A retired nurse, s [...]

Controversy over class-size requirements in early grades has emerged as the biggest issue facing Nor [...]

The wisdom of the plan by Senate leaders to cut taxes by $839 million was called into question this [...]

Several years of tax cuts have not fixed our economic problems, and more of the same won’t either In [...]

Progress on “second chance” agenda marks a rare positive development in state policy wars There are [...]

24 million---the number of people in the United States who would lose health care coverage by 2026 u [...]

Featured | Special Projects

Trump + North Carolina
In dozens of vitally important areas, policy decisions of the Trump administration are dramatically affecting and altering the lives of North Carolinians. This growing collection of stories summarizes and critiques many of the most important decisions and their impacts.
Read more


HB2 - The continuing controversy
Policy Watch’s comprehensive coverage of North Carolina’s sweeping anti-LGBT law.
Read more