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What the marriage discrimination supporters fear most

It’s often dangerous to put much stock in the fragmented comments that bombard us each day on Twitter. With so much life narration and random ruminating going on, readers will almost always do well to take each tweet with several grains of salt.

Sometimes, however, it’s clear that tweeters hit the “send” button before they’ve had time to think about how much they are actually revealing in 140 characters or less.

This latter situation clearly occurred today when the pro-dicrimination forces behind Vote4MarriageNC twitter account posted the following tweet:

“NC is the last state in the south to be able to vote on this issue. We may not get the chance to vote on this again.”

What’s implicit in this comment, of course, is the powerful fact that pro-discrimination forces have been loathe to admit: Public opinion is changing rapidly on the same-sex marriage question.

Why might this be the last chance to vote on a proposal like Amendment One? Because support for discrimination is collapsing at a rapid rate throughout the country.

The reason supporters were desperate to get their proposal on North Carolina’s 2012  primary ballot is because they know they don’t have much time. Even a six-month delay to November would have surely cost them loads of votes. Between the generational shift that’s happening in modern America and the rapid change in attitudes that’s taking place even for older voters, the window for passage of a pro-discrimination amendment in North Carolina is rapidly slamming shut.

The only question, of course, is whether the discriminators will be able to sneak their constitutional amendment into our state’s fundamental law in time.  

As today’s tweet revealed, if they fail, they know they are extremely unlikely to get another chance.     

 

3 Comments


  1. Rev Carl Johnson

    March 7, 2012 at 3:08 pm

    Their desperation should also serve as a reminder to those of us who are against discrimination that we can not allow ourselves the luxury of being lazy and lax in reminding voters of the dangers of this amnendment, and the harms it can do.

  2. randal johns

    March 7, 2012 at 6:21 pm

    I have high hopes in seeing the end of discrimination and inequality in North Carolina as well as the rest of the country.

  3. Mike P.

    March 9, 2012 at 1:56 pm

    No, the reason they fear it fails is that a potentially future Democratic leadership will not want to discuss the issue again. This has been the strategy in other states, such as Iowa: deny an amendment is needed, and then refuse to even allow the issue to be debated in the legislature once an amendment is needed.

    You have a limited understanding of history, apparently. In 2006, Arizona voters reject a marriage amendment; in 2008, they approved a modified version. That is the only time this has happened, because that is the only time voters have rejected a marriage amendment.

    Of course, the lefties around here are a minority even among NC Democrats: most PPP and Civitas polls have found either pluralities or majorities in favor of the amendment. You don’t have to scream about Republicans- try getting a majority of Democrats to oppose the amendment.

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