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Who runs a poll question like this?

Last week, the Pope Civitas group featured a “poll” on the front page of its website that asked:

“Should charter schools be required to provide meals and transportation to underprivileged students?”

The alleged results: 10% “yes” and 90% “no.”

Setting aside the utter meaninglessness of the results, who thinks to run a poll like this? Charter schools are public schools that are, by law, supposed to reflect the demographics of the communities in which they are located. How does a school pull that off (i.e. serve poor kids) when it doesn’t provide food or transportation?

While it’s clearly flawed, once can at least understand the argument made by some charters (i.e. that they’d like to provide these services but don’t get enough money to do it). But that argument is not what’s implied by the Pope Civitas “poll.” Its clear implcation is that it’s wrong for the state to even consider such a requirement.

The bottom line: Whether it’s for-profits, religious schools or the homeschoolers, the right’s gloves are coming off in the battle over public education. These people want to destroy the concept of racially and socially diverse public schools and, increasingly, they’re making no bones about it.  

You can read more on the right’s war on poor kids in today’s Radical Right Reality Check.

8 Comments


  1. Frank Burns

    March 9, 2012 at 2:26 pm

    It’s more than “these people”. The public is demanding Charter schools due to disastifaction with public schools.

  2. gregflynn

    March 9, 2012 at 3:15 pm

    It would be more accurate to say that the public is demanding charter schools due to disastifaction with private schools. Public school enrollment continues to increase while private school enrollment is on the decline.

  3. Mike P.

    March 9, 2012 at 4:35 pm

    What’s the difference between liberals and conservatives? Conservatives think the public schools are broken, and don’t deserve any more money, and they send their children to an expensive private school. Liberals think the public schools are our best asset, and only need more money, and they send their children to an expensive private school.

  4. gregflynn

    March 9, 2012 at 5:25 pm

    Of 1,645,000 K-12 students in NC, 96,000 are in private school. My child goes to public school.

  5. Frank Burns

    March 10, 2012 at 8:25 am

    I think the distinction is parents are ok with public schools through elementary school. After elementary school they are looking for options which could include private, home school or charter.

  6. david esmay

    March 11, 2012 at 2:50 pm

    Conservatives are using charter schools to resegregate public schools. If you deny busing and reduced lunch programs to to poor students, you can eliminate diversity within the system and they can effectively get the public to pay for their private education. All five of our kids attended public schools in this state and did exceptionally well. What we question is why would you want to send your kids to a school where every kid comes from the same socio-economic background? Not only would you deny your child exposure to people of diverse backgrounds, but it would also give them a distorted view of the world around them.

  7. Frank Burns

    March 12, 2012 at 5:31 am

    In my opinion, parents are not concerned about culture but in classroom disruption by children who have no respect for authority and the teachers. In that environment, how can their children learn anything?

  8. jlp75

    March 12, 2012 at 10:26 am

    It is the conservative way. Government spending is bad except when it goes into their pockets.

    Frank,

    I went to public school K – 12 and even went to ECU, which is a public university. I did well in school and have done well since. Stop making excuses for re-segregation of schools. Were there disruptions? Yes. But that is life. You will have to encounter all types of people throughout your life so you might as well be prepared for it in your education. What use is it to grow up in a bubble only to find out the truth later in life?

    Furthermore, denying poor children an education is not the answer. Some poor children are disruptions. Some are not. Those that are not learn and are able to provide for themselves later in life as opposed to living off of the system. Many grow to achieve more than their parents did. Would you deny these opportunities because they do not have enough money? Rich kids can also be disruptive.

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