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Chapel Hill urges NC voters to reject Amendment One (audio)

It took the Chapel Hill Town Council less than 30 seconds Monday evening to pass a resolution urging North Carolina voters to vote against the proposed marriage discrimination amendment on May 8th.

The Council’s resolution notes that proposed amendment would only serve to “express hostility against a minority group” and could invalidate benefits the town currently offers to employees who are in a domestic partnership.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Council of the Town of Chapel Hill that the Council urges North Carolina voters to vote against the proposed amendment on May 8, 2012 and affirms its commitment to equal rights and opportunities for Town employees and for all residents of Chapel Hill.

Monday’s quick passage came exactly six month after the body passed a similar resolution opposing the Defense of Marriage Act (Senate Bill 106) defining marriage as solely between one man and one woman.

To hear Monday’s speedy rejection of Amendment One, click below. To read the full text of their resolution, click here.

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