Top of the Morning

Top of the morning

Diane Ravitch sums up the current state of the education debate perfectly in her latest piece in the New York Review of Books, a blistering critique of U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan.

We will someday view this era as one in which the nation turned its back on its public schools, its children, and its educators. We will wonder why so many journalists and policymakers rejected the nation’s obligation to support public education as a social responsibility and accepted the unrealistic, unsustainable promises of entrepreneurs and billionaires. And we will, with sorrow and regret, think of this as an era when an obsession with testing and data obliterated any concept or definition of good education. Some perhaps may recall this as a time when the nation forgot that education has a greater purpose than preparing our children to compete in the global economy.

6 Comments

  1. Frank Burns

    March 12, 2012 at 8:55 am

    I agree with Diane Ravitch assessment of an F grade to this Admininstration’s education policies, but I don’t know what she is referring to when she says that education has a greater purpose than preparing our children for the global economy. What greater purpose is there than that?

  2. Alex

    March 12, 2012 at 9:02 am

    Let’s face it ! The nation has grown impatient with the poor results and unfulfilled promises of public education.

  3. jlp75

    March 12, 2012 at 9:35 am

    Alex once again you bring nothing to the table. You sit back and lob grenades with no substantial suggestions for improvement. Typical conservative rhetoric. It is far easier to tear something down than it is to build. Let face it, you and your type just like to complain and have nothing constructive to offer to the debate.

  4. F.S. Seawell

    March 12, 2012 at 9:51 am

    I would like to recommend a book that I think can help deepen the conversation about the greater purpose of public education and that is to prepare the next generation of Americans to fully participate, not just as individuals in the global economy, but also as members in our representative democracy. See “Preserving the Public in Public Schools” by Phil Boyle and Del Burns, published by Rowman & Littlefield Education. There is a reason the word “public” comes first in “public” schools and “public” education. “Public” means more than paid for with public dollars.

  5. Alex

    March 12, 2012 at 10:19 am

    What’s your recommendation jlp75 – spend more money ? We’ve tried that for years with little success. What about competition instead of a monopoly ?

  6. Frank Burns

    March 13, 2012 at 6:32 am

    I guess the statement didn’t mean anything but was just one of those motherhood and apple pie catch alls.