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Coming up this week…

This evening Meredith College will host a panel discussion on the constitutional amendment defining marriage between one man and one woman as the only domestic legal union that shall be valid in North Carolina.

Speakers include Maxine Eichner from the UNC Law School, Nancy Petty from Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, Anthony Biller of Coats and Benner, P.L.L.C., and Patrick Wooden of Upper Room Church in Christ. The panel will be moderated by Meredith College Assistant Professor of Religious and Ethical Studies Steven A. Benko.

The panel discussion begins at 7:00pm in Jones Auditorium and is free and open to the public.

At the same time over at William Peace University, Jeff Clements, the author of Corporations Are Not People, will be speaking about Citizens United and how some of the largest corporations in the world organized to take over our American government. The 7:00pm event in Jones Hall is sponsored by Common Cause.

Tuesday morning, the House Select Committee on Racial Discrimination in Capital Cases will meet to discuss how the Act may be amended to address the concerns of prosecutors about how the law is applied.

You may recall back in January, Republican legislators fell just a few votes short of overriding Gov. Beverly Perdue’s veto of a bill that would largely repeal North Carolina’s Racial Justice Act.

Got lunch plans Tuesday? If not, join N.C. Policy Watch at 11:45am at Marbles Museum.

As the North Carolina Education Lottery considers launching the numbers game called Keno, some critics are once again asking is this really a budget solution?

From keno to casinos to video poker, N.C. policy Watch will host a crucial conversation on “When government promotes gambling: A budget solution or state sponsored exploitation?”

Guest speakers include Les Bernal with the Stop Predatory Gambling Foundation and Charles Clotfelter, the Z. Smith Reynolds Professor of Public Policy Studies and Professor of Economics and Law at Duke University.

Tuesday evening head on over to Chapel Hill as the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources will hold its second public meeting to present a draft report on the safety of fracking and take citizens’ comments.

The 6:30pm meeting at East Chapel Hill High School auditorium (500 Weaver Dairy Rd., Chapel Hill) is expected to draw a large crowd.

On Wednesday, the House Select Committee on the State’s Role on Immigration Policy will meet at 1:00pm in Room 643 of the Legislative Office Building. When this committee met in February it ended with three undocumented protesters being arrested. Legislators are discussing how to strengthen and enforce laws against undocumented immigrants.

The “Out-of-Control” tour comes to Wilmington Wednesday evening. N.C. Policy Watch, Democracy North Carolina, Institute for Southern Studies, N.C. AFL-CIO, and Progress North Carolina will hold a meeting to discuss how hard-line conservatives are turning back the clock on progress in North Carolina and who’s bankrolling their agenda.

Want to attend? The meeting is free, open to the public and gets underway at 7:00pm at ILA 1426 Hall (Intl Longshoremen’s Assn.) 1305 S. 5th Ave.

 

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