NC Budget and Tax Center

New workforce development recommendations are a good first step, but should also include career pathways

In a widely anticipated report to the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee yesterday, staff from the General Assembly’s Program Evaluation Division presented an extremely thorough and insightful analysis of the state’s workforce development system—the interconnected array of training programs critical for upgrading the state’s labor market and workers’ ability to secure employment in a skill-intensive economy.

In evaluating North Carolina’s workforce system (and with the active participation of top stakeholders in the Department of Commerce, Community College System, and the Workforce Commission), the report provides several findings on the strengths and weaknesses in the current system and makes a number of important recommendations for reforming the state’s approach to workforce development and job training. Crucially, these reforms involve the consolidation and alignment of the dozens of programs involved in workforce training and the development of statewide performance measures to ensure that programs are actually achieving their stated objectives.

Both the findings and policy recommendations represent a critical first step for modernizing workforce development in North Carolina and especially for determining the ability of the training programs to prepare workers for employment in skill-appropriate industries.

But as important as it remains to prepare workers for their first job in an industry, it is also critical that policy makers consider the role of training programs in preparing workers for their second, and third, and fourth jobs in that industry—in effect, the importance of career pathway training programs.

Career pathways are a series of connected education and training programs and student support services that enable individuals to secure a job or advance in a demand industry or occupation, creating opportunities for workers to build their skills and secure upwardly mobile career opportunities. Ultimately, more skills mean higher wages and more opportunity to achieve mobility.

As workforce development reform moves forward—likely through a new legislative oversight committee—policy makers should pursue program alignments and create performance measures that explicitly include and address career pathways.

One Comment


  1. […] dollars for training Post on April 9, 2012 by Alexandra Sirota 8 Comments » The recent report on the state’s workforce development system offered some helpful suggestions to align the system and deliver better outcomes for North […]

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