Uncategorized

Two voices you won’t hear on the “Real Solutions Road Tour” (video)

Burlington, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point mark the first four stops for the “Real Solutions Road Tour,” sponsored by Americans for Prosperity and Pope Civitas Institute. While the advertising campaign is intended to praise the Republican leadership and the state budget, several superintendents are not calling the end results “solutions.”

Alamance-Burlington Schools Superintendent Dr. Lillie Cox told the State Board of Education last week that her school district would be making more cuts for 2012-13 – with another 48 teacher assistants and 24 teaching jobs on the line.

Dr. Don Martin, Superintendent of Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, told the board year-after-year of cuts were “really wearing on everyone” in his district.

Martin noted that while the private sector was seeing some economic recovery, school personnel were facing another round of discretionary cuts, coupled with the loss of federal EduJobs money.

“You look at the private sector, they lost a lot of jobs, there’s also some recovery. They’re starting to offer pay raises. And our folks are stagnant,” explained Martin. “And I think if people had jobs to go to, they’re starting to look. We’re fairly close to Virginia, our northern neighbor, and I fully anticipate when those opportunities present themselves, people start to say, ‘Where can I do better for my family?'”

The AFP/Civitas tour comes on the heels of a new Carolina Issues poll that found that a majority of voters would trust their local school superintendent over state legislators (63% vs. 16%) to tell them what effect recent budget cuts have had on local public schools.

To hear the superintendents from Alamance-Burlington Schools and Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, click below:

One Comment


  1. Amelia

    April 24, 2012 at 6:36 am

    Maine law specifically epmewors superintendents to approve student transfers. The final decision should rest with the superintendents, not school boards or others . And I replied that if one followed the Law, once the Super Approved the transfer, per Title 20A sec 1001 par 8, it is the School Board/Board of Directors that “shall determine which students shall attend each school, classify them and transfer them from school to school where more than one school is maintained at the same time”.One might argue that there is a conflict in the law?Then when you replied, I decided to look at your Founding Document (Plan) which was Approved by DOE to see how your AOS was set up to work.When I found that you were established with the statement MBASS, established pursuant to this Interlocal Agreement shall be governed by an AOS school board comprised of representatives of each Member School Unit”, it sounded to me as if your AOS was to be governed by the AOS School Board!That was the only area I was addressing, not the benefits or disadvantages of anything being done or not done concerning the transfer of a student, which I consider to be a completely different area.In closing, I must say that I do not believe it to be the intent of the law that a Super must make an agreement with himself! If you are Super of two schools involved with moving a student within an AOS, it might be reasonably assumed that as the setting Super of both schools, you already have the authority to do that without any additional paperwork and the additional need to notify DOE that you had transferred one of your own students?Just my two sense..Thanks for the discussion Richard, I have enjoyed it, and will plan to say Hello to you at the MSMA Conference in October.

Check Also

Four things to have on your radar — after Monday’s solar eclipse

#1 The path forward in Afghanistan – President ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement refuses to disclose any details of probe into alle [...]

Senate favors form of merit selection for judges as alternative to House judicial redistricting bill [...]

North Carolinians hoping to find out who’s been funding Rep. Justin Burr’s crusade this legislative [...]

The SePro Corporation is receiving as much as $1.3 million in taxpayer money to chemically kill the [...]

In 1896, the U.S. Supreme Court infamously upheld the legality of racial segregation and “Jim Crow” [...]

900 million---amount in dollars of the cost of the tax cuts passed this year when they are fully in [...]

Mixed and confusing signals from NC GOPers on confederate monuments Senate President Pro Tem Phil Be [...]

Here is something you probably haven’t heard much lately, if at all, given the shocking news from Ch [...]

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more