Debunking conservative myth-making about marriage

Occasional Progressive Pulse contributor Greg Flynn posted a fun and informative essay over on Blue NC early this morning about early North Carolina history, it’s relationship to the debate over the marriage discrimination amendment and the attempts by the amendment’s chief legislative sponsor, state House Majority Leader Paul Stam, to misrepresent the story. It may not change many votes today, but at least readers will know the truth.

One Comment

  1. gregflynn

    May 8, 2012 at 9:18 am

    Thanks Rob. If I had expected it to change many votes I’d have written it a long time ago. In the process of researching the marriage issue it’s been interesting peeling back the layers of myth surrounding John Locke and his patron Shaftesbury and to have attention drawn to the preamble of the ill-fated Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, drafted by Locke:

    that the government of this Province may be made most agreeable to the Monarchy under which we live, and of which this Province is a part; and that we may avoid erecting a numerous democracy

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