Uncategorized

Virtual charter hearing pushed to late June

The N.C. State Board of Education’s attempt to block a virtual charter school from opening was pushed to the end of the month.

A hearing on the objections to virtual public school run by the for-profit company K12, Inc. will now be heard the week of June 25, Superior Court Judge Robert Hobgood said in court today.

A motion to stay an administrative law judge’s May 8 order granting approval to the statewide cyber school had been scheduled for today in Wake Superior Court. Both the state and N.C. Learns, the non-profit organization behind the school, agreed to delay any court decisions about whether the virtual school should open this fall to the June 25 hearing.

The N.C. School Board Association and at least 35 of its member school boards also are objecting to the virtual school opening, and want to intervene in the case.

In addition, attorneys for the N.C. Justice Center filed an amicus brief in the matter, siding with the N.C. State Board of Education.

[N.C. Policy Watch is a news and commentary website housed under the N.C. Justice Center, a non-profit advocacy organization that works on issues that affect low-income residents. ]

The N.C. Virtual Academy hopes to recruit 2,750 students statewide in its first year and take in $18 million in federal, state and local education dollars. The school would be run by the for-profit K12, and allow students to take a full course-load of classes from their home computers while interacting with teachers online.

Over the last year, critical news articles about K12, Inc. from national newspapers like the New York Times and Washington Post have questioned the quality of education the company offers, pointing out a Colorado audit that found taxpayers paid $800,000 to much to the company and a Pennsylvania school where virtual students performed significantly worse than their public school peers. A class-action investor lawsuit is also pending against the company, accusing company leaders of making misleading statements about the performance of schools run by the company.

K12, Inc. representatives have refuted those findings, and pointed to the popularity of the virtual school in 29 states that have public online schools or charter schools run by the company.

N.C. Learns and K12, Inc. took a rarely-used route to gain approval in North Carolina. Instead of applying directly to the Office of Charter Schools in the state education department, as most charter schools do, it sought preliminary approval from the Cabarrus County School Board in January and then forwarded its application for final approval by the state education board.

But the state board didn’t act on the virtual school’s application, and N.C. Administrative Law Judge Beecher Gray later ruled in May it should have at least considered the applications. Gray then gave the school permission to open for this upcoming school year.

Check Also

UNC Board of Governors face protest, chooses new board chair and interim president

It was a busy day at the final ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein’s most important job is to keep people safe. For the Depa [...]

When Gov. Roy Cooper visits Wilmington on Monday, it's unlikely that he will be greeted by the [...]

When Gov. Roy Cooper signed the Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention or STOP Act into law last month, [...]

Support for needy districts and key positions within North Carolina’s top public school agency may b [...]

The post GenX & ’emerging contaminants’ appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

73---number of days since the Senate passed its version of the state budget that spent $22.9 billion [...]

When you lower the bar enough for what’s possible, you create a new normal in which an inch forward [...]

It’s not an original thought to point out that the Trump Administration is a larger version of what [...]

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more