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Still no apparent activity from Tedesco group

The North Carolina Center for Education Reform, the nonprofit that pays (or paid) Wake County school board member John “Tea Party” Tedesco a healthy salary so he can afford to serve in and run for public office, just passed its one-year anniversary last week. As you might recall, Tedesco’s “group”  describes its mission as follows:

“The North Carolina Center for Education Reform is the catalyst for a powerful transformation of K-12 public education. The North Carolina education system will be empowered by utilizing effective and innovative practices that can be replicated for maximum impact. Optimizing the learning experience, establishing high expectations, reducing bureaucracy, and producing measurable results for every child is essential to their future and ours.”

Pretty impressive, huh? Except, of course, that it’s not actually true.

The group is not only NOT “the catalyst for a powerful transformation of K-12 public education,” it is not — as far as one can determine from its website (and as we’ve reported previously) — a group that’s done much of anything.

Now, to be fair, lots of organizations — for-profit and nonprofit — make grand claims about their work and its importance that are, to put it politely, “aspirational.” But usually, there’s at least some kind of work product to trumpet — an event, a report, a fundraiser. Tedesco’s group has now been on the map for more than one year and paid him some real money to do something in its name. (Note: Tedesco recently told the Independent newspaper that he has not been drawing a salary in 2012).  If he had done anything of note, you’d think there might be some mention of it on the group’s website.

But, hey, maybe we missed something. If anyone out there is aware of any meaningful catalyzing  that the “Center” has been performing  in the last 12 months — aside from slapping up  boilerplate website content, that is — please send it our way so we can set the record straight. 

 

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