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New report details the cost of fracking

Environment North Carolina and local officials are calling on the General Assembly to maintain the state’s moratorium on hydraulic “fracking” along with the authority of local governments to ban it.

Their appeal was made Thursday in conjunction with the release of a new report documenting the monetary costs imposed by fracking.

Researchers looked at water contamination, health problems, impacts on public infrastructure and services, and broader economic consequences in states where hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling are already in place.

“More than half of Chatham County residents rely on private wells for their drinking water,” said Sally Kost, Chatham County Commissioner.  “As a county commissioner, I am concerned that as the drillers take their profits and leave North Carolina, the cost of the cleanup will be passed on to the Chatham County taxpayer.”

Ten counties and cities in North Carolina have already passed resolutions and ordinances against fracking.

Supporters of the practice believe it has the potential to create new jobs and lead to greater energy independence.

You can read a copy of the new report here.

2 Comments


  1. Rev. Carl Johnson

    September 20, 2012 at 3:21 pm

    Profit will usually overcome environmental concern, especially when elected politicians make the choices. And long after the profit disappears, the tax payer will be left with the cleanup. Example…the Wake Forest facility whose chemicals used to clean electronics parts are now showing up in the well water. The company is long gone. The damage is just now beginning to be realized.

    As for fracking, I say we require the NC General Assembly to use as its sole water source, waters downstream from the fracking sites. Let them drink it and feed it to their families. If they object to this, then you know the answer to the question, “Are legislators more concerned with campaign contributions from developers or the health of citizens and preventing long lasting environmental damage?”

  2. david esmay

    September 20, 2012 at 9:19 pm

    Carl, I like the way you think.

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