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NC Judicial Coalition: Through June, No Dollars

Could it be that the very idea of a super PAC supporting the election of a state Supreme Court justice has scared away donors?

The much-hyped NC Judicial Coalition — formed back in April to support the re-election of Justice Paul Newby, according to one of its founders, conservative businessman Bob Luddy — filed its initial campaign reports with the state board of elections on Oct. 5 and Oct. 9.  According to those reports, the committee has received no contributions and spent nothing  through June 30, 2012.

That’s somewhat  surprising, given that former GOP chair and now lobbyist Tom Fetzer told the Charlotte Observer in June that the committee had already received “support”  from large and small donors across the state.

But the filed reports only cover a short period of time since the super PAC’s organization. More telling perhaps will be the campaign finance report due for filing on Oct. 29, just days before the election, which should detail contributions and expenditures from July 1 through Oct. 20.

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