Uncategorized

Social Security: Keeping a half-million elderly North Carolinians out of poverty

New (2011) Census data reveal that almost a half-million North Carolinians are kept from living in poverty by Social Security. This is from a new report by the numbers experts at Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

“Social Security benefits play a vital role in reducing poverty.  Without Social Security, 21.4 million more Americans would be poor, according to the latest available Census data (for 2011).  Although most of those whom Social Security keeps out of poverty are elderly, nearly a third are under age 65, including 1.1 million children.  Depending on their design, reductions in Social Security benefits could significantly increase poverty, particularly among the elderly.”

 Here are the numbers for North Carolina:

50.4% – Percentage of elderly North Carolinians who would live in poverty without Social Security.

10.0% – Percentage who actually do live in poverty.

498,000 – Number of elderly North Carolinians lifted out of poverty by Social Security.

The bottom line: Despite its many challenges, Social Security remains one of the greatest success strories in American history.

 

 

 

4 Comments


  1. Frank Burns

    October 16, 2012 at 4:22 pm

    Indeed but without changes it will soon run out of money.

  2. david esmay

    October 17, 2012 at 12:42 pm

    Indeed, we need to correct the redistribution of wealth upwards and contributing to the false deficit narrative put forth by republicans, that 4 trillion in tax cuts for the wealthy over the last decade, be paid for by 4 trillion in in cuts to programs that serve the working/poor, including medicare, medicaid, and social security.

  3. Frank Burns

    October 17, 2012 at 4:14 pm

    David, don’t blame the guys that want to fix the problem. Blame the Democrats who just want to bury their head in the sand and hope the problem just goes away.

  4. david esmay

    October 18, 2012 at 9:58 am

    Frank you’re full of it, like always, the Republicans love borrowing and spending, just not paying. They’d rather push their debt on those who can least afford to repay it, so they can create some more. Your “guys” have no interest what so ever in addressing problems with a balanced approach. What they are is anti-government cheap labor assholes trying to pass themselves off as fiscally responsible, it is the height of hypocrisy.

Check Also

As conservative legislators ignore sea level rise, locals move ahead without them

There is a somewhat encouraging story on sea ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

A pivotal legislative task force may be just beginning its dive into North Carolina’s school funding [...]

The controversy over “Silent Sam,” the Confederate monument on UNC’s Chapel Hill campus, has been ra [...]

North Carolina tries to mine its swine and deal with a poop problem that keeps piling up A blanket o [...]

This story is part of "Peak Pig," an examination of the hog industry co-published with Env [...]

With Republicans on Capitol Hill and in the White House desperate to post a big legislative win, the [...]

Latest court system mess is directly linked to the Right’s ideological war on public structures Some [...]

Republicans in Congress are rushing to advance a tax reform bill that balloons the federal deficit s [...]

The post Charitable donations and the GOP’s chopping block appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

Spotlight on Journalism

We invite you to join a special celebration of investigative journalism! The evening will feature Mike Rezendes, a member of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Boston Globe Spotlight Team known for their coverage of the cover-up of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

Tickets available NOW!

Spotlight On Journalism

This event will benefit NC Policy Watch, a project of the North Carolina Justice Center. Sponsorship opportunities available now!

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more