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Finding common ground after the ballots are counted

Finally! Election Day is finally here. And whether you are standing in line to cast your ballot today, or whether you voted early, Tuesday’s Wilmington Star News offers an important reminder for politicians and citizens alike about the need for the state and country to work together after months of bitter, partisan campaigning.

Here’s an excerpt:

‘On Wednesday, barring any virtual hanging chads, serious legal disputes or – heaven forbid – an electoral vote tie, we will either have a new president or we will have re-elected the current one. Either way, roughly half of the electorate will be unhappy.

Yet whichever man ultimately wins that highest office, he will be the president of the United States of America, the leader of the free world. The office deserves our respect regardless of who occupies it; and the American people deserve similar respect from the officeholder. Likewise, members of Congress, governors, state legislatures and boards of county commissioners are our elected representatives – even if we didn’t vote for them. They will pass laws that affect all their constituents, regardless of political affiliation.

An election does not license the majority to govern without regard to the voices of the minority. Nor is it carte blanche for those who funded the victorious campaigns to demand the spoils. Both political parties have been guilty of ignoring the sentiments expressed by the minority party and by ordinary citizens, and many of the problems we now find ourselves dealing with reflect that divisive mentality.

Good ideas don’t come only from the left, or the right, but more often reflect a meeting somewhere between two extremes, when both sides work together to find common ground.’

You can read the entire editorial here.

3 Comments


  1. Nonanon

    November 6, 2012 at 7:08 am

    I might have agreed if this sentiment were being expressed during during GWB’s tenure or even RR’s, but for whatever reason the left just loves to hate. Go figure.

  2. Frank Burns

    November 6, 2012 at 9:09 am

    We would be guaranteed 4 more years of gridlock if Obama were to be re-elected. He has nobody else but himself to blame for that.

  3. david esmay

    November 6, 2012 at 1:51 pm

    The GOP and their congressional malfeasance are the two reasons congress polls lower than STD’s. Boehner, McConnell, Cantor, Issa and their ilk should be censured and removed from office.

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