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The genius of the market in education

Folks over on Right-wing Avenue  love to tell us how the “genius of the market” is the key to improving public education. You know how this goes: Get schools to “compete” for students and give families “choice” and then just stand back and watch as things take off.

What they, of course, never mention is this: Competition does frequently produce a lot of winners and great results, but it also produces A LOT of losers. Roughly half of new American businesses fail within five years of start-up.

This morning, a story on WRAL.com (“Parents, teachers reeling after Wake Forest school’s sudden shutdown”)  reminds us of the real world consequences that frequently result when the genius of the market works its magic in the realm of education.

And of course, if the usual pattern is followed, most of these kids in Wake Forest with no school to go to will end up back at — you guessed it — the public schools, where the system will be expected to absorb and educate them at no cost, with no questions asked.  

 

One Comment


  1. Page McCullough

    November 8, 2012 at 12:53 pm

    Charter schools cannot exist without the fall back of a public school system.

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