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Interesting stats on part-time workers

John Schmitt and Milla Sanes have an interesting post on the Center for Economic and Policy Research blog that debunks a bit of common wisdom about the long-term growth in inequality.

Their data show that, overall, the percentage of the workforce working part-time has remained basically stable at around 20% or so.

“Over the last three decades, as economic inequality has been climbing, the overall rate of part-time employment (the top line in the chart) has barely changed….The problem facing workers isn’t a rise in part-time work. The problem is the increasing precarity of full-time work”

In other words, as we’ve reported in this space on many occasions, the growth in inequality can be traced to a long series of policy shifts and changes in corporate attitudes and behavior in which the powers-that-be have simply decided they want a bigger share of the pie. Worker productivity has been going up and up, but it doesn’t matter so long as the corporate plutocrats and the politicians they hire and control promote policies that favor the wealthy.

This morning’s edition of the Weekly Briefing explores the latest example of this brand of policy and politics in North Carolina.

3 Comments


  1. Frank Burns

    November 21, 2012 at 9:24 am

    Before Advocacy Groups start pointing fingers, they should look to themselves. How many Advocacy Groups are out there? Each one has their own agenda and each one says that we are not spending enough money for their particular niche of people. When Advocacy Groups bemoan the income inequality, they should look at how their programs are driving up the cost to consumers. We need a strong economy in NC and that means welcoming business, not making them an adversary. Advocacy Groups are the problem.

  2. david esmay

    November 21, 2012 at 11:08 am

    People like you are the problem and thankfully an ever shrinking minority. Benefits and earning a living wage goes hand in hand with consumption which drives 70% of the U.S. economy. Troll away Frank.

  3. Alex

    November 23, 2012 at 3:23 pm

    Unfortunately, you can’t drive an economy on consumption when you import most of the goods.

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