8 Comments

  1. Frank Burns

    November 27, 2012 at 1:32 pm

    The income inequality is directly related to the unemployment rate. The solution is a sound economy with lots of jobs. If you don’t work, you have income inequality. Surely Chris is not proposing that those of us that are working cut our salaries and give it to those who are not working.

  2. gregflynn

    November 27, 2012 at 4:05 pm

    Income inequality is not directly related to the unemployment rate. There is no data to support that claim and a quick comparison of maps rebuts it. It’s an important factor but not directly related. Even if it did explain why the poor get poorer, unemployment would not explain the working poor or, the decline in relative value of the minimum wage or, why the rich get richer. It certainly wouldn’t explain why middle income households have lost ground relative to those at the top. Tax breaks have allowed wealth to accumulate at the top without flowing back into the economy for job creation. Trickle down doesn’t work.

  3. Frank Burns

    November 27, 2012 at 4:26 pm

    Logic supports the claim that income inequality is directly related to the unemployment rate. With a large group of people not working, a large income inequality occurs. Those that are working have more money than those who don’t. In addition federal debt is hurting the economy. http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505123_162-57547173/how-our-national-debt-hurts-our-economy/

    Continuing to spend like a drunken sailors causes slow economic growth resulting in high unemployment and longer levels of income inequality.

  4. gregflynn

    November 27, 2012 at 4:31 pm

    Your logic maybe, but not the facts.

  5. Frank Burns

    November 27, 2012 at 4:34 pm

    I’ve seen how Advocacy Groups use the “facts” to support their sob stories.

  6. gregflynn

    November 27, 2012 at 7:07 pm

    Must be quite a burden to carry around so much scorn for those less fortunate than yourself that you have to come here daily to offload your bilious disdain on the people that would speak on their behalf.

    Your comments are typically unprincipled. You use “advocacy group” as a pejorative for liberal non-profits but you have no such contempt for conservative non-profits. You claim in one thread that the only real disability is losing an arm or a leg. In another thread you mock the “sob-stories” of one-legged grandmothers.

    This may be a game to you, after you’ve finished with the Jumble, the Sudoku and the crossword, but the people at the NC Justice Center deal daily with the lives of real people in need. Some day you’ll look in the mirror and won’t see a reflection and wonder why you wasted so much time in life making like difficult for even one human being.

  7. Frank Burns

    November 28, 2012 at 5:44 am

    I’m standing up for the middle class who have no advocacy group but have to pay for all the programs that Advocacy groups come up with. My scorn is not for those less fortunate, but for the advocacy groups themselves. In my opinion, these groups are a detriment to democracy by holding pushing these narrow focused issues instead of what is best for society as a whole. My disdain is for all of them and that includes AARP, and the NRA. It is not a game to me, just giving my opinion which is my right.

  8. david esmay

    November 28, 2012 at 3:33 pm

    Frank, you don’t stand for the middle class, you parrot corporatist nonsense you read on Faux news or right wingnut blogs. This is your entire philosophy in a nut shell, “Don’t present me with facts or evidence, I’ve already made up my mind”. Unlike republicans of Ike’s generation, being one today carries a stigma, as in; not overly bright, dogmatic, incapable of rational dialogue, and phobic about anything resembling compromise.
    It’s a shame that people can’t do the right thing if they are republican. Everyday you are living proof that the GOP has gone stupid.