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First African-American woman on state Supreme Court to step down

State Supreme Court Justice Patricia Timmons-Goodson has announced that she will step down on Dec. 17, according to the News & Observer and WRAL.

Timmons-Goodson, the first African-American woman to serve on the court, was appointed in 2006 by then Gov. Mike Easley and re-elected to an eight-year term later that year.

Prior to serving on the Supreme Court, Timmons-Goodson was a Court of Appeals Judge  from 1997 to 2005.

She received her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, served as an assistant district attorney in Cumberland County from 1981 to 1983, and was then appointed to a district court judgeship and re-elected to that position in 1986, 1990 and 1994.

Gov. Beverly Perdue will appoint a successor, who will serve the remainder of Timmons-Goodson’s term, which runs through 2014.

One Comment


  1. Frances Jenkins

    November 29, 2012 at 3:40 am

    What is the deal about Perdue’s appointment process? Is this a story? In fact, has Secretay Marshall sign some paper regarding this issue? Progressive Pulse, always fair and in search of the truth, would never ever see this as the continued corruption of the Democrats in NC. They will close their eyes and yell at those who do not agree. If she appoints Sam Jr., will all the PP call a press conference because of his fund raising activity in the recent election and define which cases he should not rule on? I know Barber, Chris and Rob will be leading the charge for pure justice in NC in this matter.

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