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Poll: McCrory popular, but voters see employment status as conflict

Three weeks before Governor-elect Pat McCrory takes the oath of office, a new poll shows him enjoying a solid popularity rating.

Public Policy Polling finds McCrory has a 53% favorability rating among all voters surveyed. But more than half of those surveyed question the appropriateness of his decision to remain employed at the Moore& Van Allen law firm as he prepares to take office.

Here’s more from PPP:

‘Nevertheless voters are not happy with how McCrory is handling his transition into office. 51% think that McCrory’s continued employment at a law firm that lobbies the state represents a conflict of interest to only 31% who think it is not. And 54% think he should resign his job immediately to 25% who don’t think that’s necessary. McCrory was elected due to his broad support from independents but they think both that the job is a conflict (51/36) and that he should leave it immediately (54/30).’

McCrory won the state’s highest office in November promising to clean-up a “culture of corruption” and do things differently in Raleigh.

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