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Penny wise, pound foolish: slashing court budgets hurts business

For much of their legal careers, David Boies and Ted Olson have represented big business, often finding themselves on opposite sides of the counsel table, as they did in the Bush v. Gore case before the U.S. Supreme Court.

In recent years, though, they’ve teamed up on larger causes — taking California’s Proposition 8 case to the U.S. Supreme Court, for example.

Saving state courts from going over their own fiscal cliff has been another cause. In the short video below, they talk about what’s at stake.

Said Boies:  “The costs that are imposed on business and the rest of society, as a result of these cutbacks, are overwhelmingly larger — 10, 15, 20, 30 times more costs than you’re saving. And when you’re cutting a million dollars, but costing the economy fifteen or twenty-five million, everybody can see that that is not a sensible cut.”

One Comment


  1. Donna

    January 18, 2013 at 4:29 pm

    I continue to be astonished that AOC Director Judge John Smith continues to fail to perform two of his key responsibilities under NCGS 7A-343 – management of the court forms and the ACIS Court computer system. If he simply asked his staff to create a court form to allow criminal misdemeanor defendants to demand or waive prob. cause hearing per NCGS 15A-606, cases would move through the system expeditiously instead of being illegally continued in district court for years before they suddenly and mysteriously appear on the superior court docket. And, the ACIS court computer system can be easily fixed if Smith would phone the software developers and tell them to add a field to allow a clerk to add information pertaining to probable cause hearings. Currently there is no such field, and this also helps cause cases to be continued for years. And the ACIS court computer system records all court dates as jury trials, so no one can tell how long a case has been continued or if a defendant had a probable cause hearing prior to a jury trial as required by state law and the federal constitution’s due process clause.
    I’ve sent Judge Smith and Chief Justice Sarah Parker certified letters almost two years ago and they never replied. These are simple solutions. Additionally, several of the misdemearnor criminal court forms need corrections because they contain errors which contradict law.
    Here’s an example:

    http://carolinacrimereport.com/nc-aoc-court-forms-in-violation-of-state-statutes-and-u-s-constitution/aoc-court-form-contains-numerous-errors-obstructs-justice/

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