Uncategorized

Deferred action on Deferred Action kids spurs protest

DACA DOT protestersAbout 50 young people gathered on a frigid morning outside the offices of the state Department of Transportation in downtown Raleigh today to protest the Department’s obstruction and foot-dragging in the issuance of driver’s licenses to young people who have obtained the right to be lawfully present in the United States under the federal government’s Deferred Action program (DACA).

With chants of “out on the streets and into our cars,” the young people demanded immediate action by the Department to heed a recent opinion from the state’s Attorney General that the issuance of licenses to such applicants is both legal and required.

TDACA DOT protesters 2he demonstrators, which included participants in their ranks from as far away as Asheville, called the Department’s inaction “discrimination” and demanded that its leaders “stop bullying immigrant youth.”

One young woman from Sanford, a 21-year mother who came to the U.S. at two years of age and who graduated from high school in 2009 with a grade point average above 4.0, explained that she was unable to work and frequently found herself begging rides to attend doctor appointments with her child because she could not obtain a license.

Others told similar stories of being brought to the U.S. as small children and of growing up with the feeling of being fully American, but now facing the impossible situation of being unable to live a normal life despite having “played by the rules” (and, in many cases, succeeded remarkably well) in every other important area of their lives 

DACA DOT protesters 3Perhaps the most poignant moment in the event however (and, hopefully, most persuasive to anyone who harbors any doubts about the validity of the demonstrators’ demands or their status as genuine North Carolinians), came when a young man named Jose Rico was addressing to the crowd and urging them to speak out. On multiple occasions, Rico prefaced his statements with the un-selfconscious words “come on y’all!” 

He was, in short, despite a modest Spansish accent, a young North Carolinian speaking to a group of his fellow Tar Heels. Let’s hope the McCrory-Pope administration wakes up to this reality in short order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check Also

This Week’s Top Five on NC Policy Watch

1. Free speech policy, controversial conservative academic on ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

The UNC Board of Governors is holding its last meeting of 2017 Friday, where the latest of its many [...]

Just south of Candler off the Pisgah Highway is a lovely piece of property on Little Piney Mountain [...]

Veteran North Carolina education policy expert Kris Nordstrom has authored a new and vitally importa [...]

When Joni Robbins, a section chief in the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, closes bidding next [...]

“All speech is free, but some speech is more free than others.” This seems to be the motto of the cu [...]

Trumpists prepare to raze another vital common good law It’s hard to keep up these days with the flo [...]

The post That’s how ‘Humbug’ is done appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

The solid citizens of Johnston County, N.C. – in a fateful quirk of geography – for several years ha [...]

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more