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A challenge for NC’s Governor: Try living on $350 a week (Audio)

If you were laid off through no fault of your own, could you cover your rent or mortgage payment + utilities + food/travel expenses on $350 a week?

Community leaders and advocates for the unemployed are calling on Gov. Pat McCrory  and other legislators to try to live for one week on just $350 – the proposed maximum weekly jobless benefit that lawmakers are considering this session.

Rep. Julia Howard wants the proposed legislation to reduce the weekly benefit amount and the duration of those UI benefits to take effect in July, to expedite the repayment of $2.4 billion owed to the federal government.

But Bill Rowe with the NC Justice Center says fast-tracking the proposed changes (and the bill’s effective start date) would also mean an end to federally extended emergency jobless benefits, which were included in the recent deal to avert the fiscal cliff.

Rowe says a hasty decision by elected-officials would mean 80,000 North Carolinians lose federal jobless benefits, removing $25 million a week from the state’s economy.

For highlights from Monday’s press event outside the Old State Capitol in Raleigh, click below.

Activists will be in downtown Greensboro Tuesday and in Charlotte Wednesday, once again urging the Governor to take the $350 challenge.

 

 

3 Comments


  1. david esmay

    January 29, 2013 at 2:53 pm

    Has Art Pope’s deputy assistant governor responded to the challenge?

  2. Jeff S

    January 29, 2013 at 8:23 pm

    When will you people stop pretending that anyone cares.

    The entire movement is born out of hatred. Asking for sympathy probably makes most of these people (the shills in office, the rich bastards who own them, and the common-man conservative all) giggle with glee.

  3. […] The bottom line: I guess we know why none of the legislators behind the bill (or Governor McCrory) is willing to take the $350 challenge. […]

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