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Lawyers representing EMPLOYERS speak out against unemployment insurance bill

The North Carolina Bar Association’s Labor & Employment Law Council — a group whose members represent both employees and employers delivered a letter to Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger this morning asking him to slow down the legislation that would slash the state’s unemployment insurance system. According to the letter:

“We understand that these changes will result in a loss of approximately $225,000,000 in unemployment benefits from July 1, 2013 through December 1, 2013 and an additional loss of $350,000,000 in federal funds that would otherwise flow into the State for extended benefits during the same period.

We are concerned that the loss of these funds will not only seriously impact the families of workers who remain unemployed through no fault of their own, but also the local businesses that would inevitably suffer as citizens fail to pay their mortgage/rent, utilities, and transportation costs, and are unable to purchase food and other necessaries for themselves and their families.

We believe that there has not been adequate time for public comment or study of the full (and possibly unintended) consequences of these changes.”     

Click here to view the letter in its original format.

3 Comments


  1. david esmay

    February 12, 2013 at 12:08 pm

    And Phil’s response was, “Screw you and the people you represent, I take my marching orders from a higher authority, Governor Pope, and he takes his marching orders from the Koch brothers.”

  2. Jeff S

    February 13, 2013 at 1:00 am

    You’re not thinking big enough David. NC is the eighth state the propose a benefit cut. The marching orders are coming from higher up than peddler pope.

  3. Alex

    February 13, 2013 at 7:51 am

    Unemployment insurance has always been intended to be a short term stopgap measure to bridge periods between jobs. The long term unemployment issues we are currently experiencing probably need to be addressed in a completely different fashion. Many of these folks are not getting jobs even after the current 99-week periods, and are part of a structural problem that needs to be addressed.

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