Uncategorized

Lawyers representing EMPLOYERS speak out against unemployment insurance bill

The North Carolina Bar Association’s Labor & Employment Law Council — a group whose members represent both employees and employers delivered a letter to Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger this morning asking him to slow down the legislation that would slash the state’s unemployment insurance system. According to the letter:

“We understand that these changes will result in a loss of approximately $225,000,000 in unemployment benefits from July 1, 2013 through December 1, 2013 and an additional loss of $350,000,000 in federal funds that would otherwise flow into the State for extended benefits during the same period.

We are concerned that the loss of these funds will not only seriously impact the families of workers who remain unemployed through no fault of their own, but also the local businesses that would inevitably suffer as citizens fail to pay their mortgage/rent, utilities, and transportation costs, and are unable to purchase food and other necessaries for themselves and their families.

We believe that there has not been adequate time for public comment or study of the full (and possibly unintended) consequences of these changes.”     

Click here to view the letter in its original format.

3 Comments


  1. david esmay

    February 12, 2013 at 12:08 pm

    And Phil’s response was, “Screw you and the people you represent, I take my marching orders from a higher authority, Governor Pope, and he takes his marching orders from the Koch brothers.”

  2. Jeff S

    February 13, 2013 at 1:00 am

    You’re not thinking big enough David. NC is the eighth state the propose a benefit cut. The marching orders are coming from higher up than peddler pope.

  3. Alex

    February 13, 2013 at 7:51 am

    Unemployment insurance has always been intended to be a short term stopgap measure to bridge periods between jobs. The long term unemployment issues we are currently experiencing probably need to be addressed in a completely different fashion. Many of these folks are not getting jobs even after the current 99-week periods, and are part of a structural problem that needs to be addressed.

Check Also

The best editorial of the weekend

The Republican power grabs just keep on a ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Conference comes a day after new report lauds benefits of same-day registration The new line-up for [...]

North Carolina’s largest public school system may be warning of “enormous disruptions” without speed [...]

Carol Turner hadn’t lived in North Carolina long before last November’s election. A retired nurse, s [...]

Controversy over class-size requirements in early grades has emerged as the biggest issue facing Nor [...]

The wisdom of the plan by Senate leaders to cut taxes by $839 million was called into question this [...]

Several years of tax cuts have not fixed our economic problems, and more of the same won’t either In [...]

Progress on “second chance” agenda marks a rare positive development in state policy wars There are [...]

24 million---the number of people in the United States who would lose health care coverage by 2026 u [...]

Featured | Special Projects

Trump + North Carolina
In dozens of vitally important areas, policy decisions of the Trump administration are dramatically affecting and altering the lives of North Carolinians. This growing collection of stories summarizes and critiques many of the most important decisions and their impacts.
Read more


HB2 - The continuing controversy
Policy Watch’s comprehensive coverage of North Carolina’s sweeping anti-LGBT law.
Read more