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Ban on direct corporate campaign contributions still the law

Just a week after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case challenging limits on overall amounts of individual campaign contributions, McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, the court today refused without explanation to take up a challenge to the ban on direct contributions by corporations.

In Danielczyk v. U.S., two people criminally charged with funneling corporate contributions through individual donors during Hillary  Clinton’s presidential campaign argued that after Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the ban on direct corporate contributions was a distinction without a difference. A federal court in Virginia agreed, but the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reversed, finding that independent expenditures (at issue in Citizens United) and direct contributions are subject to different standards and level of scrutiny.

With that refusal, the 4th Circuit decision stands and the ban on direct corporate campaign contributions remains in tact.

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