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McCrory signs bill blocking Medicaid expansion

Gov. Pat McCrory signed the bill this afternoon that prevented North Carolina from adding groups of low-income residents to Medicaid insurance, putting the state in with a handful of other states with Republican governors that have turned down the expansion.

The expansion could have given 500,000 low-income residents health insurance, and would have been largely paid for with federal dollars in the first three years. McCrory signed the bill into law in private, without press or media access to the signing.

The N.C. Justice Center’s Adam Linker offered his take here on McCrory’s decision, saying that, “(i)t will mean more people delay necessary health care treatments. It will mean a population that is sicker and dies sooner….”

McCrory’s press office released this written statement from there governor afterwards:

In my first eight weeks as governor I’ve had to make some difficult decisions.  My team conducted a thorough review of the Affordable Care Act and its impact on North Carolina.  Before considering Medicaid expansion, we must reform the current system to make sure people currently enrolled receive the services they need and more taxpayer dollars are not put at risk.

 

5 Comments


  1. Doug

    March 6, 2013 at 6:56 pm

    This signing sure makes sense when you look at the big picture. Here are some relative statistics comparing 2007 to current data. We have really fallen far and NC has been at the forefront of the fall.

    •Dow Jones Industrial Average: Then 14164.5; Now 14164.5 (For now)
    •Regular Gas Price: Then $2.75; Now $3.73
    •GDP Growth: Then +2.5%; Now +1.6%
    •Size of Fed’s Balance Sheet: Then $0.89 trillion; Now $3.01 trillion
    •US Debt as a Percentage of GDP: Then ~38%; Now 74.2%
    •US Deficit (LTM): Then $97 billion; Now $975.6 billion (WOW)
    •Total US Debt Oustanding: Then $9.008 trillion; Now $16.43 trillion (WOW again!)
    •US Household Debt: Then $13.5 trillion; Now 12.87 trillion (at least there has been some progress)
    •S&P Rating of the US: Then AAA; Now AA+

    We are essentially broke and would be unable to afford more Medicaid I guess the government just will never understand.

  2. Alex

    March 6, 2013 at 7:08 pm

    Don’t forget the $85 trillion in unfunded liabilities for all of the entitlement promises/obligations the federal government has made. We are truly running a Ponzi scheme, and one day it will all come tumbling down .

  3. Doug

    March 6, 2013 at 7:19 pm

    Yeah, Madoff goes to jail. Too bad the same fate will not befall the DC crowd.

  4. Kathy

    March 11, 2013 at 1:21 pm

    Good for Governor McCrory. Got to STOP borrowing money. WE are broke. Why can’t Liberals see this? 16 TRILLION!!!

  5. Mary Bartholomew

    March 12, 2013 at 3:57 pm

    I don’t blame him. I would have signed it behind closed doors too. He should be ashamed of himself!

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