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Professors weigh in against death penalty legislation

Lethal injectionIn keeping with its practice of reversing progress and bucking national trends toward saner and more progressive public policies, the state Senate will take up a bill this morning to repeal the Racial Justice Act and jump-start executions. If the bill advances, however, it will do so over the objections of a group of more than 70 college and university professors who have delivered a letter to lawmakers spelling out the flaws in the legislation.

Meanwhile, one of the professors in the group — Appalachian State criminologist Matthew Robinson — authored an op-ed in the Winston-Salem Journal yesterday that does an excellent job of explaining why the proposed legislation is counterproductive. 

“As a professional criminologist who has written numerous articles and books on the factors that produce crimes like murder and how to prevent them, I am confident that the death penalty is a distraction from policies that actually work. So we should stop wasting our time “tinkering with the machinery of death” and get to the hard work of finally getting serious about instituting more effective crime prevention policies.”

You can read Robinson’s entire essay by clicking here.

2 Comments


  1. Jack

    March 26, 2013 at 10:34 am

    Let’s ask the men and women who have been found innocent after twenty years in prison for a crime they didn’t commit what they think of the death penalty?

  2. Frances Jenkins

    March 27, 2013 at 8:24 am

    Matt needs to drive up to Wilkes County and view the crime photos of the eight year old boy and his mother. The person charged would be the boy friend in this horrible death. Not only does this SOB need to be fried in the most inhumane way, he then needs to sit on a burnt stump in hell.

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