Uncategorized

Bill to restrict Pre-K eligibility sails through House committee

House Bill 935, NC Pre-Kindergarten Law Changes, faced little opposition in the House’s Health and Human Services committee this morning. The bill passed 14-4.

HB 935 would lessen the number of low-income children eligible for the state’s award-winning Pre-K program by changing the definition of “at-risk” children. Previously, those who were determined to be at-risk, and thus eligible for pre-kindergarten, fell into one of three categories:

  • A child with an identified disability as indicated by the child having a current Individualized Education Plan (IEP);
  • A child of an active duty member of the Armed Forces, or a child of a deceased Armed Forces member; or
  • A child whose family’s gross income was at or below approximately 200%

     of the federal poverty guidelines.

The bill seeks to change that last criterion by reducing the maximum gross income to just 100%, or $19,500 for a family of three. Rep. Burr, sponsor of the bill, explained that this move would better serve “those truly at-risk children.”

This change would block more than a third of current participants, or about 10,000 children, from accessing pre-kindergarten. The average cost of high quality pre-K is around $1,000/month. It would be unlikely for a family of three making $25,000/year to be able to shoulder that cost.

Rep. Insko was the only vocal opponent of the bill, explaining to her colleagues that “we are not taking care of the future of this state if we don’t make sure these kids are ready for kindergarten…we must invest in our children.”

Rob Thompson, Executive Director of the Covenant with North Carolina’s Children, said in a press release after the bill passed,“Pre-kindergarten is an investment in our future workforce. We need to look for ways to expand access to NC Pre-K, not narrow it.”

The bill will now move on to the House floor.

2 Comments


  1. Jack

    April 30, 2013 at 3:31 pm

    No child left behind – yeah, right!

    As the bill reveals the NCGA supports the revival of institutionalized segregation and discrimination.

    There will be continued chipping away of charter school eligibility criteria.

  2. Tenita Deal

    April 30, 2013 at 11:00 pm

    North Carolina never ceases to amaze me with it’s outrageously stupid decisions. I certainly don’t vote for these cavemen and women.

Check Also

Changing hats, but my focus remains on education

Dear NC Policy Watch readers, It’s been a ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

The following information is gathered from the Guttmacher Institute: 90% — North Carolina counties i [...]

Nothing is off the table when it comes to Republican judicial reform, and a former Wake County judge [...]

On a cozy autumn evening at the luxurious Umstead Hotel in Cary, a medley of corporate luminaries, s [...]

A fix for North Carolina’s class size crisis in March? A GOP senator from Wake County tells his cons [...]

The post Classic projection appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

It was a snowy and shortened work week for a lot of people in North Carolina, but unfortunately, tha [...]

Mounting student debt is a nagging problem for most families these days. As the cost of higher educa [...]

Latest racist attacks on immigrants could be an important tipping point As bleak as our national pol [...]

Upcoming Events

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more